LINGUIST List 9.1203

Mon Aug 31 1998

Qs: Fossilization, NLP technology, Adjectives

Editor for this issue: Brett Churchill <brettlinguistlist.org>


We'd like to remind readers that the responses to queries are usually best posted to the individual asking the question. That individual is then strongly encouraged to post a summary to the list. This policy was instituted to help control the huge volume of mail on LINGUIST; so we would appreciate your cooperating with it whenever it seems appropriate.

Directory

  1. frances6, Longitudinal Studies on Fossilization
  2. Anne Sing, Unique NLP Technology?
  3. Hiroaki Tanaka, Query: ?very on/off: gradability of non-gradable adjectives

Message 1: Longitudinal Studies on Fossilization

Date: Thu, 27 Aug 1998 21:05:55 -0700
From: frances6 <frances6ix.netcom.com>
Subject: Longitudinal Studies on Fossilization

Greetings!

I am doing research on fossilized L2 pronunciation. While searching the 
literature I found numerous articles that discuss fossilization 
(Selinker, 1972; Adjemian, 1976; Vigil and Oller, 1976; Selinker and 
Lamendella, 1979; Schachter, 1988, 1990; Selinker and Lakshmanan, 1992, 
Selinker and Han 1996, etc.) and several longitudinal studies that focus 
on stabilization/fossilization of morphological and syntactic structures 
(Tarone, Frauenfelder and Selinker, 1976; Selinker, Swain and Dumas, 
1975; Schumann, 1976; Shapira, 1978; Schmidt, 1983, etc.). In addition, 
I have accessed the LINGUIST LIST archives and found useful references 
from a previous posting (Vol-5-998 - Sept. 1994).

Unfortunately, I am unable to find longitudinal studies of fossilization 
that focus on phonetics and/or phonology. Does anyone know of such 
studies?

I would be happy to summarize the responses.

					Thanks in advance,

					Fran Gulinello
					CUNY Graduate Center
					frances6ix.netcom.com
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Message 2: Unique NLP Technology?

Date: Fri, 28 Aug 1998 13:46:51 -1000 (HST)
From: Anne Sing <anneshtdc.org>
Subject: Unique NLP Technology?


As part of our due dilligence in researching our NLP work, I am
looking to see if anyone has seen technology similar to that being
offered (for Free) by our company at http://www.haptek.com. The free
dowload is called "ChatterBox" and it is intended for use with the 3-D
animations that are available at that site.

It is quite fun actually so if you enjoy "talking computers" you might
want to take a look. The product allows you to chat with the
animations in the following manner.

You (or the designer) enter in information statements and then later
you query the character for that information such as:

 my appointments are at 5 pm and 6 am
 your name is roswell
 you live in new york
 the man who has the gun lives in the park
 the tall dark stranger was killed by the man with
 gun
 the tall dark stranger was jogging through the park
 your fax number is 8085393924
 John's web address is john.com

 when are my appointments?
 what is your name?
 what was the stranger doing?
 what is your fax number?
 what is john's web address?

and so on.


I would like to be know as accurately as possible if there are any
other such products anywhere else either as a commercial product or
research project. If so I would like to the url's or email addresses
of those who make them.

I will post a summary to the list. 

Phil Bralich


______________________________
Philip A. Bralich, Ph.D.
President and CEO
Ergo Linguistic Technologies
2800 Woodlawn Drive, Suite 175
Honolulu, HI 96822

Tel: (808)539-3920
Fax: (808)539-3924
bralichhawaii.edu
http://www.ergo-ling.com
Philip A. Bralich, Ph.D.
President and CEO
Ergo Linguistic Technologies
2800 Woodlawn Drive, Suite 175
Honolulu, HI 96822

Tel: (808)539-3920
Fax: (808)539-3924
bralichhawaii.edu
http://www.ergo-ling.com

Philip A. Bralich, President
Ergo Linguistic Technologies
2800 Woodlawn Drive, Suite 175
Honolulu, HI 96822
tel:(808)539-3920
fax:(880)539-3924
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Message 3: Query: ?very on/off: gradability of non-gradable adjectives

Date: Mon, 31 Aug 1998 16:23:37 +0900
From: Hiroaki Tanaka <hiro-tias.tokushima-u.ac.jp>
Subject: Query: ?very on/off: gradability of non-gradable adjectives

Dear all,
 I'm working on gradability of non-gradable adjectives,
such as _very dead_, _very much alive_, _very pregnant_,
_very on_. One conclusive comment I derived from my
work is that there must be some contrast in the pre-
context to make these phrases better. The next example
says that the speaker thought that the sisters he was
looking for were dead, but in cotrast they were very
much alive.

 (1) In April 1944, I was transferred to Long Island, New
York, and I though that this would be an opportunity to
find out if the Everleighs were still alive, and if they were
alive, to learn if they'd give me permission to write the
play about them...
 When I reached New York, I went to see Lait. He
assured me the Everleighs were _very much alive_, living
as Minna and Aida Lester at 20 West 71st Street.
 (Irving Wallace, The Golden Room, p. xii)

 If I am right, I can make the following _very on_
sentences better to put them in the contrastive context
like (4) below. As a non-native speaker's judgement, I
find (1a) and (2a) are unaccpetable and (1b) and (2b) are
better than (1a) and (2a), because _very much_ rather
than _very_ can be more useful for emphasizing the
speaker's opnion. Of course, these sentences as well as
(1) above have comic flavour or have a tongue in cheek
as a Canadian native speaker of English in my university
says. Do you agree with his opnion? Please judge these
senteces below as OK, ?, or * in each slot, and if you
find them accpetable, please paraphrase them into
possible alternatives in the same context. And if you find
that _very_ and _very much_ are different, please state
what exactly the difference is.

 (2) a. ( )The light is very on/off.
 b. ( )The light is very much on/off.

 (3) a. ( )The strike is very on.
 b. ( )The strike is very much on.

 (4) A: At last, the strike has come to an end.
 B: No, you're wrong. ( )It is very/very much on,
 even more on than a few weeks ago.

 (5) a. ( )John had a TV very on/off.
 b. ( )John had a TV very much on/off.

 (6) a. ( )The door is very open.
 b. ( )The door is very much open.
 c. ( )The door is wide open.

 Thank you very much in advance. I will definitely post a summary soon.
Please e-mail me directly to the following e-mail address.

Best wishes,

Hiroaki Tanaka

Associate Professor
Faculty of Integrated Arts and Sciences
Tokushima University, Japan

1-1, Minamijousanjioma,
Tokushima, 770,
Japan

phone & fax: +81 886 56 7125
e-mail: hiro-tias.tokushima-u.ac.jp
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