LINGUIST List 9.1633

Wed Nov 18 1998

Qs: Loanwords, Textual Criticism/Spain, Phonetics

Editor for this issue: Karen Milligan <karenlinguistlist.org>


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Directory

  1. projetcp, English loanwords in Italian and Chinese
  2. Teresa Moralejo, Medieval Textual Criticism in Spain
  3. Joe Stemberger, Phonetics courses

Message 1: English loanwords in Italian and Chinese

Date: Tue, 17 Nov 1998 13:37:54 -0500
From: projetcp <projetcplli.ulaval.ca>
Subject: English loanwords in Italian and Chinese

Dear Linguist List Readers,

I am looking for a list of English loanwords in Italian and a list of
English loanwords in Chinese. If you know where I can find this
information, please send me the references.

Thank you

Mlanie Savard


Departement des langues et linguistique
Universite Laval
Quebec (Quebec)
G1K 7P4
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Message 2: Medieval Textual Criticism in Spain

Date: Tue, 17 Nov 1998 00:49:18 PST
From: Teresa Moralejo <tmoralejohotmail.com>
Subject: Medieval Textual Criticism in Spain


I would really appreciate it if anyone could provide me with any
information about Spanish universities where research projects on
textual criticism and editing of Medieval texts, preferably English,
are currently being done, or about any professor who works on that
area.

Thank you very much for your help,
Teresa


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Message 3: Phonetics courses

Date: Tue, 17 Nov 1998 17:14:06
From: Joe Stemberger <stembergmaroon.tc.umn.edu>
Subject: Phonetics courses

In my phonetics course, students are expected to master both the perception 
and the production of most human speech sounds.

There are a few sounds that have consistently proven to be difficult for 
students to produce. I have some tips, and Ladefoged gives some in his 
textbook, but they don't help many/most students.

If anyone has production tips that have proven to be effective (or even 
semi-effective) for the following, please reply to me off-list.


1) Trills (both alveolar and uvular)

2) clicks (students consistently nasalize them, and some never get
 past that. Is there any way to get them to stop nasalizing
 the clicks? For that matter, if anyone knows WHY students
 want to nasalize them, that might in itself be helpful. I
 originally thought that it was based on the "mwa" kissing
 sound effect used by English speakers, which is the only
 syllable in English in which the click is integrated with
 a vowel, but I've since found
 this tendency in students from all language backgrounds, 
 so I don't think that that's the reason.)

3) voiceless unaspirated stops for people whose native language has only
 voiceless aspirated stops
 (I can get Japanese students to generalize from long stops, but it is
 then often difficult for them to get rid of the glottal stricture
 that is associated with long voiceless stops in Japanese. Other
 languages don't have even that much to offer as a base that can be
 extended and shaped.)

4) ejectives and implosives, when they don't seem to be able to get the
 raising and lowering of the larynx under conscious control.


Any help anyone has to offer will be appreciated.

thanks.


- -Joe Stemberger
 University of Minnesota
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