LINGUIST List 9.1830

Wed Dec 23 1998

Qs: British/American English, Language learning

Editor for this issue: Jody Huellmantel <jodylinguistlist.org>


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  1. Tomoko Takahashi, The expression of British English and American English
  2. AJDeFaz, Second language learning

Message 1: The expression of British English and American English

Date: Tue, 22 Dec 1998 00:18:48 -0800 (PST)
From: Tomoko Takahashi <ahirusan4575yahoo.com>
Subject: The expression of British English and American English


I'm studying about the British English(BE) and American English(AE).
I have some questions about it. Could you please help my study?

This list is BE and AE. 
BE--biscuits, chips, maize, bill, tube, lift, cinema and toilet. 
AE-crackers&cookies, French fries, corn, check, subway, elevator,
movie theater and restroom.

1. Can BE speakers understand in AE? Also, Can AE speakers understand
 in BE?

2. What percentage of these words are used in conversation of each
 countries?

3. Do AE speakers use in conversation in British English? 

4. Is it difficult to communicate with each other because of the
 difference of expression?
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Message 2: Second language learning

Date: Tue, 22 Dec 1998 18:31:15 EST
From: AJDeFaz <AJDeFazaol.com>
Subject: Second language learning

A question came up today and I was hoping some individuals on the List
could point me in the right research direction. Cummins and others
argue that students literate in the first language do better at
learning to read and write in their second language--or at least find
it easier. The question that arose was, is the opposite true? Does
learning a second language have a positive effect on the first
language? If so, how? If not, why not?

Any insights would be appreciated. 
I will gladly post a summary if warranted.
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