LINGUIST List 9.481

Sun Mar 29 1998

Qs: Preverb, Unaccusative, "up", Teaching Ling

Editor for this issue: Anita Huang <anitalinguistlist.org>


We'd like to remind readers that the responses to queries are usually best posted to the individual asking the question. That individual is then strongly encouraged to post a summary to the list. This policy was instituted to help control the huge volume of mail on LINGUIST; so we would appreciate your cooperating with it whenever it seems appropriate.

Directory

  1. Edith A Moravcsik, collective and perfect
  2. bingfu, Inventory of unaccusative verbs
  3. radical, "up"
  4. WOMENinTEC, Teaching Linguistics to High School Students

Message 1: collective and perfect

Date: Fri, 27 Mar 1998 17:21:23 -0600 (CST)
From: Edith A Moravcsik <edithcsd.uwm.edu>
Subject: collective and perfect


In languages that have preverbs, is anyone familiar with cases where a
preverb having a COLLECTIVE or ASSOCIATIVE meaning developed a
RESULTATIVE or PERFECTIVE function in the verbal system?

Is anyone familiar with any cases where a preverb having RESULTATIVE or
PERFECTIVE meaning gradually bleached to a general meaning of 
+INTENSIFICATION?

I am interested in this because these pathways of development are
sometimes postulated for the historical development of the prefix ga- in
Germanic. You can respond to me directly at gdaviscsd.uwm.edu
Thanks in advance.

Garry Davis
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Message 2: Inventory of unaccusative verbs

Date: Fri, 27 Mar 1998 17:11:41 -0800 (PST)
From: bingfu <bingfuusc.edu>
Subject: Inventory of unaccusative verbs

Dear netters,

 	The semantic scope of unaccusative verbs varies 
from language to language. In Chinese, it contains tree 
types of verbs: presence verbs ('to be'
'exist'), appearance verbs ('come' 'arrive') and 
disapearance verbs ('disappear', 'vanish', 'die'). 

	If there-construction is taken as one
criterion for unaccusative verbs, then, 
dissapearance verbs are not unaccusative verbs, as 
shown below:

	There appeared a man in the hill.
But	* There disappeared a man in the hill.


	Now, my question is:
	
	How about other languages? Does your native 
language have patterns with Chinese or English? 

	Any information will be most welcome
and I will make a summary after I get sufficient responses.

	Thanks!

			Bingfu Lu
			USC
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Message 3: "up"

Date: Sat, 28 Mar 1998 18:08:07 +0900
From: radical <trikfishchollian.dacom.co.kr>
Subject: "up"

This should be an easy one for you linguists. I'm an ESL teacher in
Korea. Recently our class made a list of idioms that contain the
preposition "up."

line up; start up; make up; wake up; stand up; work up; take up; break
up; listen up; and so forth...

my questions are:

1. What is the function of the preposition in these idioms? 
2. Is there a technical linguistic name for such a construction?
3. Is there any commonality of meaning in the use of the word "up" in
these examples?

All responses would be greatly appreciated!
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Message 4: Teaching Linguistics to High School Students

Date: Sat, 28 Mar 1998 21:10:35 EST
From: WOMENinTEC <WOMENinTECaol.com>
Subject: Teaching Linguistics to High School Students

Dear Linguists,

I am interested in finding information on how to teach linguistics to high
school students. I am a graduate student in TESOL at NYU. Any help in this
matter would be appreciated.

Sincerely,

Ms. Tommy McDonell
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