LINGUIST List 9.724

Fri May 15 1998

Qs: CMC, ZISA database, /rg/ and /g/ clusters

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Directory

  1. magura, to all those concerned with CMC [lost in bits]
  2. Patrick Andre Mather, ZISA database
  3. manaster, /rg/ and /g/ clusters

Message 1: to all those concerned with CMC [lost in bits]

Date: Fri, 15 May 1998 01:00:59 +0200
From: magura <maguracn.cz.top.pl>
Subject: to all those concerned with CMC [lost in bits]

Dear linguists,
I am about to finish my master's thesis on CMC. Among thousands of bits of
electronic data I have found a following piece of text which I would like to
include in my thesis:

"Messages delivered electronically are neither ?spoken? nor ?written? in the
conversational sense of these words. There is an easy interaction of
participants and alternation of topics typical of some varieties of spoken
English. However, they cannot be strictly labeled as spoken messages since
the participants neither see nor hear each other. Nor can they be concluded
strictly written since many of them are composed directly online, thereby
ruling out the use of planning and editing strategies which are at the
disposal of even the most informal writer."

The problem is that I don't know the source of this piece and thus I cannot
put a referrence for that. I was thinking whether anybody of you knows where
this piece comes from or who the author is.
I would appreciate your help as I was unable to locate the work that it
could come from.
tafn mike
____________________________________________________________
Michal Lisecki <maguracz.top.pl> or <mliseckikki.net.pl>
UIN [4324037] IRC [lisu] http://priv2.onet.pl/ka/mlisecki
'The limits of my language mean the limits of my world' L.W.
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Message 2: ZISA database

Date: Thu, 14 May 1998 23:50:32 -0400 (EDT)
From: Patrick Andre Mather <matherverb.linguist.pitt.edu>
Subject: ZISA database


I am working on a project involving L1 transfer in SLA. Is there any way 
for me to consult the ZISA database (e.g., on CD-ROM, or on-line) to look 
for specific structures in L2 data? Also, are there any publications 
containing (portions of) the ZISA database?

I would be grateful for any information on this subject.

Andre Mather
University of Pittsburgh

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Message 3: /rg/ and /g/ clusters

Date: Fri, 15 May 1998 01:25:13 -0400 (EDT)
From: manaster <manasterumich.edu>
Subject: /rg/ and /g/ clusters

I know that there are languages where /rg/ and/or /lg/
clusters turn to /rj/ and/or /lj/ (using 'j' in its
IPA sense equivalent to the American linguist's 'y').
But is there a language in which the change is inhibited
by a following /r/ or /l/, so that hypothetically
rg > rj and rg > lj but rgl, rgr, lgr, and/or lgl do not change?

AMR
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