LINGUIST List 9.907

Fri Jun 19 1998

Calls: Meaning Change-Variation, Speech

Editor for this issue: Anita Huang <anitalinguistlist.org>


Please do not use abbreviations or acronyms for your conference unless you explain them in your text. Many people outside your area of specialization will not recognize them. Also, if you are posting a second call for the same event, please keep the message short. Thank you for your cooperation.

Directory

  1. Klaus von Heusinger, MEANING CHANGE - MEANING VARIATION
  2. Bergler Sabine, Transcription of Continuous Speech Workshop

Message 1: MEANING CHANGE - MEANING VARIATION

Date: Tue, 16 Jun 1998 19:18:20 +0200
From: Klaus von Heusinger <Klaus.Heusingeruni-konstanz.de>
Subject: MEANING CHANGE - MEANING VARIATION


====================== CALL FOR PAPERS=====================

 MEANING CHANGE - MEANING VARIATION

 University of Konstanz, Germany

 February 24-26, 1999


Invited speakers:

Nicholas Asher (Austin, USA)
Johannes Dlling (Leipzig, Germany)
Peter Gaerdenfors (Lund, Sweden)
Dirk Geeraerts (Leuven, Belgien)
Ulrike Haas-Spohn (Konstanz, Germany)
Ekkehart Knig (Berlin, Germany)
Brigitte Nerlich (Nottingham, UK)

===========================================================

We are pleased to announce the workshop 'Meaning Change - Meaning
Variation' as part of the 21st annual meeting of the German Society of
Linguistics (DGfS) in Konstanz, Germany (http://dgfs99.uni-konstanz.de).

The workshop 'Meaning Change - Meaning Variation' aims at bringing
together researchers in formal semantics, cognitive semantics, historical
linguistics and analytical philosophy in order to discuss questions of
meaning change and meaning variation. Historical linguists have developed
impressing inventories of examples of meaning (and other) changes,
documented in etymological lexica. Cognitive semanticists often offer
richer notions of "meaning" than the one traditionally used in formal
semantics, notions which seem better fit to integrate a creative dimension.
On the other hand, people working in a formal semantic framework should
face the challenge posed to their completely static picture by diachronic
meaning change. Changes are, we think, not instances of common confusion or
error. On the contrary, they are one evidence that language itself has to
be seen as an ever evolving object, adapting to our ever changing view of
the ("real") world.

Specific areas of inquiry include, but are not limited to the following:

 * semi-productive lexical processes (metonymy, polysemy, etc.)
 * interaction of psychological, historical and linguistic facts in the
 development of new language stages
 * case studies in diachronic meaning change
 * grammaticalization and meaning change
 * polysemy and semantic fields
 * formal treatments of metaphor


PAPERS in GERMAN or ENGLISH are invited from any of the mentioned fields.
The papers should address semantic change or semantic variation from more
than one aspect. Papers that indicate an inherent interest in the
perspective of other disciplines or that intend to bridge the approaches
from different subfields are preferred.

The deadline for receipt of abstracts is


 August 15, 1998


Please, send a one-page abstract (preferably by email) to:

Regine Eckardt/Klaus von Heusinger
FG Sprachwissenschaft
Fach D 185
D-78457 Konstanz
Germany
email: {regine.eckardt; klaus.heusinger}uni-konstanz.de

We will also be happy to answer all further questions which might arise.
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Message 2: Transcription of Continuous Speech Workshop

Date: Tue, 16 Jun 1998 15:07:16 -0400
From: Bergler Sabine <berglercs.concordia.ca>
Subject: Transcription of Continuous Speech Workshop


 COLING-ACL 98

 Workshop on

 PARTIALLY AUTOMATED TECHNIQUES FOR TRANSCRIBING
 NATURALLY OCCURRING, CONTINUOUS SPEECH

 August 16, 1998 (following ACL/COLING-98)
 University of Montreal, Montreal (Quebec, Canada)




DESCRIPTION
- ---------

The development of robust systems for speech analysis and synthesis
depends crucially on the availability of well-annotated corpora of
naturally occurring, continuous speech. Yet existing speech corpora
are rarely well-annotated. A key to proper annotation is the
availability of partially automated systems for linking selected
portions of a visual display of speech to the corresponding
transcriptions. To be of practical use, such systems must be able to
handle large files of digitized speech and they should permit
transcriptions at different levels of analysis.

 This workshop is devoted to the presentation and discussion of
papers and software demonstrations which reflect the current state of
the art. The presentations address the development, use, and
evaluation of such systems.


REGISTRATION
- ----------

Registration is now open for this workshop. Registration details can
be found at 

http://coling-acl98.iro.umontreal.ca

Registration befroe July 1 is 50 CAN (35 CAN for students) for
participants of the main conference. Anybody wishing to attend only
this workshop can do so by pre-registering the same way and submitting
a fee of 150 CAN. Preregistration is strongly advised.


WORKSHOP PROGRAM
- --------------

Session 1			

9:15-9:30 
Opening remarks 
Nancy Belmore
Concordia University

9:30-10:05
Recognition of Spontaneous Speech (Invited talk)
Peter Stubley
Nortel
	
10:05-10:30
Break			
	
Session 2			

10:30-11:05 
Towards Multimodal Spoken Language Corpora: Transtool and
Synctool Joachim Nivre, Elisabeth Ahlsen, Jens Allwood, Leif
Gronqvist, Jenny Holm, Dario Lopez-Kasten, Sylvana Sofkova, Kristina
Tullgren Goteborg University

11:05-11:40
Speech Annotation by Multi-sensory Recording
Robert Luk 
Hong Kong Polytechnic University
	
11:40-12:15
How Phone Duration and Segmental Processing Improve Continuous 	Speech
Signal Labeling 
Andre-Obrecht, N. Parlangeau, F. Pellegrino
Universite Paul Sabatier - CNRS

12:15-1:15 
Lunch			
	
Session 3			

 1:15-1:50
Grapheme-to-phoneme Transcription Rules for Spanish with Application
to Automatic Speech Recognition and Synthesis 
Patrizia Bonaventura, Fabio Giuliani, Juan M. Garrido, Isabel Orten
Cluster Reply Consultant, Turin and Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona
	
 1:50-2:25
The Value of Minimal Prosodic Information
Caroline Lyon and Jill Hewitt
University of Hertfordshire

 2:25-3:00
Taped demonstrations 
	
 3:00-3:30
Break			
	
Session 4			

 3:30-4:00
On-line demonstrations

 4:00-5:00
Round table discussion
	

Workshop Organization
 Sabine Bergler
	Department of Computer Science 
	Concordia University 
	1455 de Maisonneuve Blvd West 
	Montreal, QC H3G 1M8


	e-mail trans98cs.concordia.ca

Program Committee

 Nancy Belmore
 Sabine Bergler
 John Esling
 Eric Keller
 Roland Kuhn
 Douglas O'Shaughnessy
 Ching Y. Suen
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