LINGUIST List 9.977

Mon Jun 29 1998

Books: The History of Linguistics

Editor for this issue: Anita Huang <anitalinguistlist.org>


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Directory

  1. Bernadette Martinez-Keck, Books on the History of Linguistics

Message 1: Books on the History of Linguistics

Date: Mon, 29 Jun 1998 15:01:45 -0400
From: Bernadette Martinez-Keck <berniebenjamins.com>
Subject: Books on the History of Linguistics

John Benjamins Publishing would like to call your attention to the
following new titles in the History of Linguistics:


THE EMERGENCE OF SEMANTICS IN FOUR LINGUISTIC TRADITIONS

HEBREW, SANSKRIT, GREEK, ARABIC

Wout van Bekkum, Jan Houben, Ineke Sluiter, Kees Versteegh

1997 ix, 322 pp. Studies in the History of the Language Sciences, 82

US/Canada: Cloth: 1 55619 617 2 Price: US$99.00

Rest of the world: Cloth: 90 272 4568 1 Price: Hfl. 198,--

John Benjamins Publishing web site: http://www.benjamins.com

For further information via e-mail: servicebenjamins.com

The aim of this study is a comparative analysis of the role of semantics
in the linguistic theory of four grammatical traditions, Sanskrit,
Hebrew, Greek, Arabic. If one compares the organization of linguistic
theory in various grammatical traditions, it soon turns out that there
are marked differences in the way they define the place of 'semantics'
within the theory. In some traditions, semantics is formally excluded
from linguistic theory, and linguists do not express any opinion as to
the relationship between syntactic and semantic analysis. In other
traditions, the whole basis of linguistic theory is semantically
orientated, and syntactic features are always analysed as correlates of a
semantic structure. However, even in those traditions, in which semantics
falls explicitly or implicitly outside the scope of linguistics, there
may be factors forcing linguists to occupy themselves with the semantic
dimension of language. One important factor seems to be the presence of a
corpus of revealed/sacred texts: the necessity to formulate hermeneutic
rules for the interpretation of this corpus brings semantics in through
the back door.


THE NOBLEST ANIMATE MOTION

SPEECH, PYSIOLOGY AND MEDICINE IN PRE-CARTESIAN LINGUISTIC
THOUGHT

Jeffrey Wollock

1997 xlvi, 470 pp. Studies in the History of the Language Sciences, 
83

US/Canada: Cloth: 1 55619 620 2 Price: US$160.00

Rest of the world: Cloth: 90 272 4571 1 Price: Hfl. 320,--

John Benjamins Publishing web site: http://www.benjamins.com

For further information via e-mail: servicebenjamins.com

The body of theory on speech production and speech disorder developed
prior to Descartes has been so neglected by historians that its very
existence is practically unknown today. Yet it provides a framework for
understanding the speech process which is not only comprehensive and
coherent, but of great relevance to current debates on issues of language
performance and applied linguistics. This is because, the author
contends, current theoretical difficulties stem largely from initial
errors of Descartes; whereas earlier theoretical formulations, while
outlining a bio-mechanics of speech, retain the central role of the human
agent.

The discussions explicated in this book come mainly from the natural-
philosophic and medical literature of Greco-Roman Antiquity, the Middle
Ages, and the Renaissance and early 17th century. This uncharted
territory is mapped for the first time by tracing its textual history and
diffusion as well as explaining the theory on its own terms but in
language that will be clear and comprehensible to non-specialists.
Interdisciplinary in perspective, the book encompasses topics of interest
not only to the language sciences, but also to the biosciences, medicine,
philosophy of human movement, psychology and behavioral sciences,
neurosciences, speech pathology, experimental phonetics, speech and
rhetoric, and the history of science in general.

- ------------------------------------------------------------

Bernadette Martinez-Keck Tel: (215) 836-1200

Publicity/Marketing Fax: (215) 836-1204

John Benjamins North America e-mail:berniebenjamins.com

PO Box 27519 

Philadelphia PA 19118-0519 


Check out the John Benjamins web site:

http://www.benjamins.com
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1998 Contributors

  • Addison Wesley Longman
  • Blackwell Publishers
  • Cambridge University Press
  • CSLI Publications
  • Edinburgh University Press
  • Garland Publishing
  • Holland Academic Graphics (HAG)
  • John Benjamins Publishing Company
  • Lawrence Erlbaum Assoc.
  • Oxford University Press
  • Francais Pratique
  • Routledge
  • Summer Institute of Linguistics
  • Mouton de Gruyter