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The Social Origins of Language

By Daniel Dor

Presents a new theoretical framework for the origins of human language and sets key issues in language evolution in their wider context within biological and cultural evolution


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Preposition Placement in English: A Usage-Based Approach

By Thomas Hoffmann

This is the first study that empirically investigates preposition placement across all clause types. The study compares first-language (British English) and second-language (Kenyan English) data and will therefore appeal to readers interested in world Englishes. Over 100 authentic corpus examples are discussed in the text, which will appeal to those who want to see 'real data'


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Book Information

   
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Title: Category Neutrality
Subtitle: A Type-Logical Investigation
Written By: Neal Whitman
Series Title: Outstanding Dissertations in Linguistics
Description:

'Feature neutrality' is an issue that has received much attention among linguists. For example, consider the sentence, 'I have never, and will never, put my name on this document.' Here, the verb 'put' acts simultaneously as a past participle (as in 'have never put') and a base form (as in 'will never put'), and is therefore said to be neutral between the two forms. Similar examples have been found for many languages.

The accepted wisdom is that neutrality is possible only for morphosyntactic features such as verb form, gender, number, declension class-not at the level of gross syntactic category, where the semantic differences are more significant. In other words, it has been claimed that 'category neutrality,' where a word or phrase is used simultaneously with more than one syntactic category, does not exist. (A famous example is the glaring ungrammaticality of this sentence, in which 'can' is used simultaneously as a main verb and auxiliary verb: 'I can tuna and get a new job.') In this book, however, Neal Whitman shows that category neutrality does exist in English. This not only challenges the current thinking, but also raises foundational questions about the nature of ambiguity.

Publication Year: 2004
Publisher: Routledge (Taylor and Francis)
Review: Read the review
BibTex: View BibTex record
Linguistic Field(s): Syntax
Issue: All announcements sent out by The LINGUIST List are emailed to our subscribers and archived with the Library of Congress.
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Versions:
Format: Hardback
ISBN: 0415970946
ISBN-13: N/A
Pages: 320
Prices: U.S. $ 90.00