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"Buenos dias", "buenas noches" -- this was the first words in a foreign language I heard in my life, as a three-year old boy growing up in developing post-war Western Germany, where the first gastarbeiters had arrived from Spain. Fascinated by the strange sounds, I tried to get to know some more languages, the only opportunity being TV courses of English and French -- there was no foreign language education for pre-teen school children in Germany yet in those days. Read more



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What is English? And Why Should We Care?

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To find some answers Tim Machan explores the language's present and past, and looks ahead to its futures among the one and a half billion people who speak it. His search is fascinating and important, for definitions of English have influenced education and law in many countries and helped shape the identities of those who live in them.


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Medical Writing in Early Modern English

Edited by Irma Taavitsainen and Paivi Pahta

This volume provides a new perspective on the evolution of the special language of medicine, based on the electronic corpus of Early Modern English Medical Texts, containing over two million words of medical writing from 1500 to 1700.


Book Information

   

Title: Opening Windows on Texts and Discourses of the Past
Edited By: Janne Skaffari
Matti Peikola
Ruth Carroll
Risto Hiltunen
Brita Wårvik
URL: http://www.benjamins.com/cgi-bin/t_bookview.cgi?bookid=P%26bns%20134
Series Title: Pragmatics & Beyond New Series 134
Description:

This volume presents a variety of pragmatic and discourse analytical
approaches to a wide range of linguistic data and historical texts,
including data from English, French, Irish, Latin, and Spanish. This
diversity of research questions and methods is a feature of the field of
historical pragmatics, which by its very nature has to take into account
the multiplicity of historical contexts and the infinite variety of human
interaction. This is highlighted in the book’s introduction by means of the
metaphor of "opening windows". Each chapter is a window affording a
different view of the linguistic and textual landscape. Some of these
windows were opened by historical linguists who have acquired discourse
perspectives, some by pragmaticians with historical interests, and others
by literary scholars drawing from linguistic pragmatics.

Table of contents


A frame for windows: On studying texts and discourses of the past
Matti Peikola and Janne Skaffari 1–4

News discourse: Mass media communication from the seventeenth to the
twenty-first century
Andreas H. Jucker 7–21

Advertising discourse in eighteenth-century English newspapers
Maurizio Gotti 23–38

Presidential inaugural addresses: A study in a genre development
Natalia Kovalyova 39–52

Freedom of speech at stake: Fallacies in some political discourses in the
Early Republic
Juhani Rudanko 53–63

Text-initiating strategies in eighteenth-century newspaper headlines
Patrick Studer 65–79

Patterns of agentivity and narrativity in early science discourse
Heidrun Dorgeloh 83–94

The economics academic lecture in the nineteenth century: Marshall's
Lectures to Women
Gabriella Del Lungo Camiciotti 95–107

Contesting authorities: John Wilkins' use of and attitude towards the
Bible, the classics and contemporary science in The Discovery of a World in
the Moone (1638)
Marko Oja 109–122

Personal pronouns in argumentation: An early tobacco controversy
Maura Ratia 123–141

Criticism under scrutiny: A diachronic and cross-cultural outlook on
academic conflict (1810–1995)
Francoise Salager-Meyer 143–160

The underlying pattern of the Renaissance botanical genrepinax
Philippe Selosse 161–178

Genres and the appropriation of science: Loci communes in English in the
late medieval and early modern period
Irma Taavitsainen 179–196

Chaucer's narrators and audiences: Self-deprecating discourse in Book of
the Duchess and House of Fame
Michael Foster 199–213

Discourse on a par with syntax, or the effects of the linguistic
organisation of letters on the diachronic characterisation of the text type
Javier Pérez-Guerra 215–235

Verba sic spernit mea: The usage of rupture of coherence in Seneca's tragedies
Augustin Speyer 237–256

'Ther been thinges thre, the whiche thynges troublen al this erthe': The
discourse-pragmatics of 'demonstrative which'
Alexander T. Bergs 259–277

Processes underlying the development of pragmatic markers: The case of (I) say
Laurel J. Brinton 279–299

From certainty to doubt: The evolution of the discourse marker voire in French
Amalia Rodríguez Somolinos 301–317

Politeness as a distancing device in the passive and in indefinite pronouns
Junichi Toyota 319–339

Language contact and discourse 341

Discourse features of code-switching in legal reports in late medieval England
Mary Catherine Davidson 343–351

Focusing strategies in Old French and Old Irish
Barbara Wehr 353–379

Medieval mixed-language business discourse and the rise of Standard English
Laura Wright 381–399

Publication Year: 2005
Publisher: John Benjamins
Review: Read the review
BibTex: View BibTex record
Linguistic Field(s): Discourse Analysis
Historical Linguistics
Pragmatics
Ling & Literature
Subject Language(s): English
Latin
Spanish
French, Old
Irish, Old
Issue: All announcements sent out by The LINGUIST List are emailed to our subscribers and archived with the Library of Congress.
Click here to see the original emailed issue.

Versions:
Format: Hardback
ISBN: 1588116263
ISBN-13: 9781588116260
Pages: x, 418
Prices: U.S. $ 169
 
Format: Hardback
ISBN: 9027253773
ISBN-13: N/A
Pages: x, 418
Prices: Europe EURO 125.00