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Words Onscreen

By Naomi S. Baron

Words Onscreen "explores how technology is reshaping our understanding of what it means to read."


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Communication Accommodation Theory

Edited by Howard Giles

Most people modify their ways of speaking, writing, texting, and e-mailing, and so on, according to the people with whom they are communicating. This fascinating book asks why we 'accommodate' to others in this way, and explores the various social consequences arising from it.


Book Information

   

Title: Comprehension: A Paradigm for Cognition
Written By: Walter Kintsch
Description:

In this book, Walter Kintsch presents a theory of human text comprehension
and extends his analysis to related areas. Comprehension is conceptualized
as a two-stage process: first, approximate, inaccurate representations are
constructed via context insensitive construction rules, which are then
integrated via a spreading activation constraint satisfaction process. In
Part I, the general theory is presented and an attempt is made to situate
it within the current theoretical landscape in cognitive science. The
second part addresses many of the topics that are typically found in a
cognitive psychology text, including how word meanings are identified in a
discourse context; how words are combined to form coherent representations
of texts, both at the local and global level; what the role is of working
memory in comprehension; how relevant knowledge is activated during
reading; and what is the distinction between remembering a text and
learning from a text.

Publication Year: 1997
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
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BibTex: View BibTex record
Linguistic Field(s): Cognitive Science
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