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May I Quote You on That?

By Stephen Spector

A guide to English grammar and usage for the twenty-first century, pairing grammar rules with interesting and humorous quotations from American popular culture.

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The Cambridge Handbook of Endangered Languages

Edited By Peter K. Austin and Julia Sallabank

This book "examines the reasons behind the dramatic loss of linguistic diversity, why it matters, and what can be done to document and support endangered languages."

Book Information


Title: Comprehension: A Paradigm for Cognition
Written By: Walter Kintsch

In this book, Walter Kintsch presents a theory of human text comprehension
and extends his analysis to related areas. Comprehension is conceptualized
as a two-stage process: first, approximate, inaccurate representations are
constructed via context insensitive construction rules, which are then
integrated via a spreading activation constraint satisfaction process. In
Part I, the general theory is presented and an attempt is made to situate
it within the current theoretical landscape in cognitive science. The
second part addresses many of the topics that are typically found in a
cognitive psychology text, including how word meanings are identified in a
discourse context; how words are combined to form coherent representations
of texts, both at the local and global level; what the role is of working
memory in comprehension; how relevant knowledge is activated during
reading; and what is the distinction between remembering a text and
learning from a text.

Publication Year: 1997
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
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Linguistic Field(s): Cognitive Science
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