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Words in Time and Place: Exploring Language Through the Historical Thesaurus of the Oxford English Dictionary

By David Crystal

Offers a unique view of the English language and its development, and includes witty commentary and anecdotes along the way.


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Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases

By Peter Mark Roget

This book "supplies a vocabulary of English words and idiomatic phrases 'arranged … according to the ideas which they express'. The thesaurus, continually expanded and updated, has always remained in print, but this reissued first edition shows the impressive breadth of Roget's own knowledge and interests."


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The Brill Dictionary of Ancient Greek

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Book Information

   

Title: Degrammaticalization
Written By: Muriel Norde
Description:

Grammaticalization is a well-attested process of linguistic change in which
a lexical item becomes a function word, which may be further reduced to a
clitic or affix. Proponents of the universality of grammaticalization have
usually argued that it is unidirectional and have thus found it a useful
tool in linguistic reconstruction. In this book Professor Norde shows that
change is reversible on all levels: semantic, morphological, syntactic, and
phonological. As a consequence, the alleged unidirectionality of
grammaticalization is not a reliable reconstructional tool, even if
degrammaticalization is a rare phenomenon.

Degrammaticalization, she argues, is essentially different from
grammaticalization: it usually comprises a single change, examples being
shifts from affix to clitic, or from function word to lexical item. And
where grammaticalization can be seen as a process, degrammaticalization is
often the by-product of other changes. Nevertheless, she shows that it can
be described, like grammaticalization, in a principled way, in order to
establish whether a change in a word has been from more to less grammatical
or vice versa, and the stages by which it has become so. Using data from
different languages she constructs a typology of degrammaticalization
changes. She explains why degrammaticalization is so rare and why some
linguists have such strongly negative feelings about the possibility of its
existence. She adds to the understanding of grammaticalization and makes a
significant contribution to methods of linguistic reconstruction and the
study of language change. She writes clearly, aiming to be understood by
advanced undergraduate students as well as appealing to scholars and
graduate researchers in historical linguistics.

Publication Year: 2009
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Review: Read the review
BibTex: View BibTex record
Linguistic Field(s): Historical Linguistics
Linguistic Theories
Issue: All announcements sent out by The LINGUIST List are emailed to our subscribers and archived with the Library of Congress.
Click here to see the original emailed issue.

Versions:
Format: Paperback
ISBN: 0199207933
ISBN-13: 9780199207930
Pages: 256
Prices: U.S. $ 39.95

 
 
Format: Hardback
ISBN: 0199207925
ISBN-13: 9780199207923
Pages: 256
Prices: U.S. $ 99.00