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Latin: A Linguistic Introduction

By Renato Oniga and Norma Shifano

Applies the principles of contemporary linguistics to the study of Latin and provides clear explanations of grammatical rules alongside diagrams to illustrate complex structures.


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The Ancient Language, and the Dialect of Cornwall, with an Enlarged Glossary of Cornish Provincial Words

By Frederick W.P. Jago

Containing around 3,700 dialect words from both Cornish and English,, this glossary was published in 1882 by Frederick W. P. Jago (1817–92) in an effort to describe and preserve the dialect as it too declined and it is an invaluable record of a disappearing dialect and way of life.


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Linguistic Bibliography for the Year 2013

The Linguistic Bibliography is by far the most comprehensive bibliographic reference work in the field. This volume contains up-to-date and extensive indexes of names, languages, and subjects.


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Title: Syllable Structure
Subtitle: The Limits of Variation
Written By: San Duanmu
Description:

This book looks at the range of possible syllables in human languages. The
syllable is a central notion in phonology, yet basic questions about it
remain poorly understood and phonologists are divided on even the most
elementary issues. For example, the word "city" has been syllabified as
"ci-ty" (the 'maximal onset' analysis), "cit-y" (the 'no-open-lax-V'
analysis), and "cit-ty" (the 'geminate C' analysis).

San Duanmu explores and clarifies these and many other related issues
through an in-depth analysis of the entire lexicons of several languages.
Some languages, such as Standard and Shanghai Chinese, have fairly simple
syllables, yet a minimal difference in syllable structure has led to a
dramatic difference in tonal behavior. Other languages, such as English,
German, and Jiarong, have long consonant clusters and have been thought to
require very large syllables: San Duanmu shows that the actual syllable
structure in these languages is much simpler. He bases his analyses on
quantitative data, paying equal attention to generalizations that are
likely to be universal. He shows that a successful analysis of the syllable
must take into account several theories, including feature theory, the
Weight-Stress Principle, the size of morpheme inventory, and the metrical
representation of the syllable.

San Duanmu's clear exposition will appeal to phonologists and advanced
students and will provide a new benchmark in syllabic and prosodic
analysis. He also offers an answer to the intriguing question: how
different can human languages be?

Publication Year: 2010
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Review: Not available for review. If you would like to review a book on The LINGUIST List, please login to view the AFR list.
BibTex: View BibTex record
Linguistic Field(s): Phonology
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Versions:
Format: Paperback
ISBN: 019958110X
ISBN-13: 9780199581108
Pages: 304
Prices: U.S. $ 45.00