Publishing Partner: Cambridge University Press CUP Extra Publisher Login
amazon logo
More Info

New from Oxford University Press!


It's Been Said Before

By Orin Hargraves

It's Been Said Before "examines why certain phrases become clichés and why they should be avoided -- or why they still have life left in them."

New from Cambridge University Press!


Sounds Fascinating

By J. C. Wells

How do you pronounce biopic, synod, and Breughel? - and why? Do our cake and archaic sound the same? Where does the stress go in stalagmite? What's odd about the word epergne? As a finale, the author writes a letter to his 16-year-old self.

Book Information

Sun Image

Title: Comparative Grammar of the Semitic Languages
Written By: De Lacy O'Leary
Series Title: LINCOM Orientalia 05

New Edition

Already in the eleventh Century A.D. the Rabbi Jehuda Hayyug (Abu Zakaria
Yahya) began to apply the methods of the Arabic grammarians to Hebrew and
thus unconsciously laid the foundation of the comparative philology of the
Semitic languages. It was already known that a close relationship existed
between Aramaic and Hebrew, but it was commonly supposed that Aramaic
was a corruption from Hebrew. Theological prepossessions inclined the Jews
to regard Hebrew as the parent, not only of Aramaic and Arabic, but of all
other languages as well, and this opinion was generally adopted by Christian
writers also. Even this view, however, admitted that a much closer
relationship existed between Hebrew, Arabic, and Aramaic, than between
Hebrew and any other language; and to this closely related group a fourth
member, Ethiopic, was added in the seventeenth Century, the name Ethiopic
being used by Europeans to designate Ge'ez, the ancient classical language
of Abyssinia. The decipherment of the cuneiform inscriptions in the
nineteenth Century added Babylonian-Assyrian as a fifth member (adopted
from the introduction of 1928 edition).

I. The Semitic Languages (The Semitic Group, Babylonia and Assyria,
Canaan, Aramaic, Arabic (Hijaz dialect, Nejd, Iraq, Syria and Palestine,
Egypt, North Afriea, Malta, Hadramaut, Oman, Southern Arabic), Abyssinian.
II. The Consonant sounds.
III. Temporary Modifications of Consonants.
IV. The Vowels.
V. Temporary Modifications of Vowel Sounds.
VI. Temporory Syllabic Changes.
VII. The Personal Pronoun.
VIII. Demonstrative Pronouns.
IX. Relative and Interrogative Pronouns.
X. The Noun.
XI. The Verb.
XII. The particles.

This re-edition has been published as no. 05 in the LINCOM Orientalia (LIOR)
series (originally published 1928, London,author's affiliation: Lecturer in
Aramaic, Bristol University).

ISBN 9783895862410. LINCOM Orientalia 05. 298pp. 2010.

Publication Year: 2010
Publisher: Lincom GmbH
Review: Not available for review. If you would like to review a book on The LINGUIST List, please login to view the AFR list.
BibTex: View BibTex record
Linguistic Field(s): Historical Linguistics
Language Documentation
Subject Language(s): Arabic, Standard
Arabic, Mesopotamian
Neo-Aramaic, Assyrian
Arabic, Egyptian
Aramaic, Official
Language Family(ies): Semitic
Issue: All announcements sent out by The LINGUIST List are emailed to our subscribers and archived with the Library of Congress.
Click here to see the original emailed issue.

Format: Paperback
ISBN-13: 9783895862410
Pages: 298
Prices: Europe EURO 64.80