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Latin: A Linguistic Introduction

By Renato Oniga and Norma Shifano

Applies the principles of contemporary linguistics to the study of Latin and provides clear explanations of grammatical rules alongside diagrams to illustrate complex structures.


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The Ancient Language, and the Dialect of Cornwall, with an Enlarged Glossary of Cornish Provincial Words

By Frederick W.P. Jago

Containing around 3,700 dialect words from both Cornish and English,, this glossary was published in 1882 by Frederick W. P. Jago (1817–92) in an effort to describe and preserve the dialect as it too declined and it is an invaluable record of a disappearing dialect and way of life.


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Linguistic Bibliography for the Year 2013

The Linguistic Bibliography is by far the most comprehensive bibliographic reference work in the field. This volume contains up-to-date and extensive indexes of names, languages, and subjects.


Book Information

   

Title: Regimes of Derivation in Syntax and Morphology
Written By: Edwin Williams
URL: http://www.routledge.com/books/details/9780415887236/
Series Title: Routledge Leading Linguists
Description:

"Regimes of Derivation in Syntax and Morphology" presents a theory of the
architecture of the human linguistic system that differs from all current
theories on four key points. First, the theory rests on a modular separation of
word syntax from phrasal syntax, where word syntax corresponds roughly to
what has been called derivational morphology. Second, morphosyntax
(corresponding to what is traditionally called "inflectional morphology") is the
immediate spellout of the syntactic merge operation, and so there is no
separate morphosyntactic component. There is no LF (logical form) derived;
that is, there is no structure which 'mirrors' semantic interpretation ("LF");
instead, semantics interprets the derivation itself. And fourth, syntactic
islands are derived purely as a consequence of the formal mechanics of
syntactic derivation, and so there are no bounding nodes, no phases, no
subjacency, and in fact no absolute islands. Lacking a morphosyntactic
component and an LF representation are positive benefits as these provide
temptations for theoretical mischief. The theory is a descendant of the
author's "Representation Theory" and so inherits its other benefits as well,
including explanations for properties of reconstruction, remnant movement,
improper movement, and scrambling/scope interactions, and the different
embedding regimes for clauses and DPs. Syntactic islands are added to this
list as special cases of improper movement.

Publication Year: 2011
Publisher: Routledge (Taylor and Francis)
Review: Not available for review. If you would like to review a book on The LINGUIST List, please login to view the AFR list.
BibTex: View BibTex record
Linguistic Field(s): Linguistic Theories
Morphology
Syntax
Issue: All announcements sent out by The LINGUIST List are emailed to our subscribers and archived with the Library of Congress.
Click here to see the original emailed issue.

Versions:
Format: Hardback
ISBN-13: 9780415887236
Pages: 184
Prices: U.S. $ 125.00
U.K. £ 85.00

 
 
Format: Electronic
ISBN-13: 9780203830786
Pages: 184
Prices: U.S. $ 120.00