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Presents a new theoretical framework for the origins of human language and sets key issues in language evolution in their wider context within biological and cultural evolution


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Preposition Placement in English: A Usage-Based Approach

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Title: Roots and Affixes
Subtitle: Eliminating Lexical Categories from Syntax
Written By: Marijke De Belder
Series Title: LOT dissertation series
Description:

Roots and Affixes is an investigation into the primitives of syntax. It focuses on
the lexical projection and the categorial head. Accordingly, it consists of two
parts. The first part argues that the features of lexical vocabulary items (such
as light and kiss) are not an active part of the syntactic derivation. The author
provides empirical support for the claim that vocabulary items are inserted post-
syntactically, adopting the view that syntax operates on UG-features only. She
argues that the root terminal node is a by-product of the operation Merge that is
characterized by the mere absence of features. It is further shown that
functional structure determines subcategories of lexical items. In the second
part of the thesis it is argued that categorial heads do not exist. As a result,
derivational affixes do not realize categorial heads. The author proposes instead
that derivational affixes are lexical vocabulary items which realize root
positions. It is shown that the abandonment of categorial heads does not lead to
a loss of explanatory adequacy. The general conclusion is that lexical categorial
features are not a primitive of syntax.

Publication Year: 2011
Publisher: Netherlands Graduate School of Linguistics / Landelijke (LOT)
Review: Read the review
BibTex: View BibTex record
Linguistic Field(s): Syntax
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Versions:
Format: Paperback
ISBN-13: 9789460930652