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Oxford Handbook of Corpus Phonology

Edited by Jacques Durand, Ulrike Gut, and Gjert Kristoffersen

Offers the first detailed examination of corpus phonology and serves as a practical guide for researchers interested in compiling or using phonological corpora


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The Languages of the Jews: A Sociolinguistic History

By Bernard Spolsky

A vivid commentary on Jewish survival and Jewish speech communities that will be enjoyed by the general reader, and is essential reading for students and researchers interested in the study of Middle Eastern languages, Jewish studies, and sociolinguistics.


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Indo-European Linguistics

New Open Access journal on Indo-European Linguistics is now available!


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Title: A Grammar of the Gujarātī Language
Written By: Clair Tisdall
Series Title: LINCOM Gramatica
Description:

The Gujarati language belongs, like the Marathi, Hindi, Panjabi, Oriya, and many other Indian dialects, to the Aryan family, being a daughter of the Sanskrit. Its closest affinities are with the Western Panjabi on the one side, and the Braj Bhasha, an old form of Hindi, on the other. Besides various local dialects of Gujarati, there are three main varieties of the written and spoken language. First, Hindi Gujarati, which is that adopted—and rightly so—by the Government as the Standard, and taught in the schools. Second, Parsi Gujarati, the language as spoken and written by the Parsis. This differs from ordinary Gujarati in that it admits pure Persian words in considerable numbers, especially in connection with religious matters, besides a host of Arabic and other words taken from the Urdu language, and that its grammar is in a very unfixed and irregular condition. Thirdly, Muhammadan Gujarati, which, like Parsi Gujarati, employs a great number of words borrowed from the Hindüstani (and through it from Persian and Arabic). But, though the vocabulary of the language varies considerably according as the Speaker is a Hindu, a Parsi, or a Muslim, yet its grammar—when spoken correctly—is practically one and the same. We have taken Hindi Gujarati as our Standard in this Grammar, for, if that is learnt, the few variations of form used in the other dialects will present no difficulty, especially as they are to a great degree mere matters of spelling. Contents: Alphabet, parts of speech (nouns, adjective, pronouns, verb, indeclinables, numerals), syntax, reading lessons.

Publication Year: 2012
Publisher: Lincom GmbH
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BibTex: View BibTex record
Linguistic Field(s): Language Documentation
Typology
Indo-Aryan Linguistics
Subject Language(s): Gujarati
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Versions:
Format: Paperback
ISBN-13: 9783862900671
Pages: 189
Prices: Europe EURO 55.10