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Oxford Handbook of Corpus Phonology

Edited by Jacques Durand, Ulrike Gut, and Gjert Kristoffersen

Offers the first detailed examination of corpus phonology and serves as a practical guide for researchers interested in compiling or using phonological corpora


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The Languages of the Jews: A Sociolinguistic History

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A vivid commentary on Jewish survival and Jewish speech communities that will be enjoyed by the general reader, and is essential reading for students and researchers interested in the study of Middle Eastern languages, Jewish studies, and sociolinguistics.


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Indo-European Linguistics

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Book Information

   

Title: Dependent-Head Synthesis in Nivkh
Subtitle: A contribution to a typology of polysynthesis
Written By: Johanna Mattissen
URL: http://www.benjamins.nl/cgi-bin/t_bookview.cgi?bookid=TSL_57
Series Title: Typological Studies in Language 57
Description:

This book offers an innovative approach to three interlaced topics: A systematic analysis of the morphosyntatic organization of Nivkh (Paleosiberian); a cross-linguistic investigation of complex noun forms (parallel to complex (polysynthetic) verb forms); and a typology of polysynthesis. Nivkh (Gilyak) is linguistically remarkable because of its highly complex word forms, both verbs and nouns. They are formed productively from ad hoc concatenation of lexical roots in dependent - head relations without further morphological marking: primary object - predicate, attribute - noun, noun - relational morpheme ("adposition"). After an in-depth examination of the wordhood of such complexes the morphological type of Nivkh is explored against the background of polysynthesis, noun incorporation, verb root serialization, noun complexes and head/dependent marking. For this purpose, a new delimitation and classification of polysynthesis is proposed on the basis of an evaluation of 75 languages. Besides contributing to a reconciliation of previous diametrically opposed approaches to polysynthesis, this study challenges some common preconceived notions with respect to how languages "should be".


Table of contents

Abbreviations viii
Acknowledgements x
1. Introduction 1–34
2. Nivkh phonology and morphophonemics 35–64
3. Head-dependent synthesis and wordhood in Nivkh 65–121
4. The Nivkh noun plus verb complex 122–168
5. Is there noun incorporation in Nivkh? 169–181
6. The Nivkh verb plus verb complex 182–201
7. Is Nivkh a polysynthetic language? 202–219
8. The Nivkh nominal complex 220–248
9. Complex noun forms in the world’s languages 249–272
10. Typological outlook 273–289
Appendix 290–297
References 298–314
Bibliography on Nivkh 315–340
Index 341–350

Publication Year: 2004
Publisher: John Benjamins
Review: Read the review
BibTex: View BibTex record
Linguistic Field(s): Typology
Subject Language(s): Gilyak
Issue: All announcements sent out by The LINGUIST List are emailed to our subscribers and archived with the Library of Congress.
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Versions:
Format: Hardback
ISBN: 1588114767
ISBN-13: 9781588114761
Pages: x, 350 pp.
Prices: U.S. $ 176
 
Format: Hardback
ISBN: 9027229651
ISBN-13: N/A
Pages: x, 350 pp.
Prices: EUR 130.00