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Latin: A Linguistic Introduction

By Renato Oniga and Norma Shifano

Applies the principles of contemporary linguistics to the study of Latin and provides clear explanations of grammatical rules alongside diagrams to illustrate complex structures.


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The Ancient Language, and the Dialect of Cornwall, with an Enlarged Glossary of Cornish Provincial Words

By Frederick W.P. Jago

Containing around 3,700 dialect words from both Cornish and English,, this glossary was published in 1882 by Frederick W. P. Jago (1817–92) in an effort to describe and preserve the dialect as it too declined and it is an invaluable record of a disappearing dialect and way of life.


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Linguistic Bibliography for the Year 2013

The Linguistic Bibliography is by far the most comprehensive bibliographic reference work in the field. This volume contains up-to-date and extensive indexes of names, languages, and subjects.


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First Language

Call Deadline: 30-Sep-2014

Call Information:
Indigenous children's language: Acquisition, preservation and evolution of language in minority contexts

Over the last decade or so there has been a surge in interest in the acquisition of small Indigenous languages across the world. There are a few significant reasons for this growth. Firstly, indigenous languages are dying at an alarming rate, which means that now is often our last chance to study their acquisition. Secondly, there is a broad recognition among child language researchers that our theories of acquisition are skewed by the over-representation of data from large European languages (especially English), whereas many children across the world are acquiring typologically under- studied languages (e.g. polysynthetic languages), often in situations of rapid language shift.
Field studies, in contexts such as remote communities, or investigations of minority language users' development in multilingual societies will be of interest. A range of disciplinary perspectives, theoretical positions, and methodological strategies is likely to be represented in the Special Issue.

Prospective authors are encouraged to email the editors to discuss potential contributions (b.kelly@unimelb.edu.au; evan.kidd@anu.edu.au; g.wigglesworth@unimelb.edu.au). Papers should be submitted through the First Language manuscript central site (http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/fla) by 30th. September 2014.

Papers should be not more than 8000 words in length, and conform to the First Language submission guidelines.

All papers will be submitted to the normal review process.


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