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The Social Origins of Language

By Daniel Dor

Presents a new theoretical framework for the origins of human language and sets key issues in language evolution in their wider context within biological and cultural evolution


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Preposition Placement in English: A Usage-Based Approach

By Thomas Hoffmann

This is the first study that empirically investigates preposition placement across all clause types. The study compares first-language (British English) and second-language (Kenyan English) data and will therefore appeal to readers interested in world Englishes. Over 100 authentic corpus examples are discussed in the text, which will appeal to those who want to see 'real data'


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Free Access 4 You

Free access to several Brill linguistics journals, such as Journal of Jewish Languages, Language Dynamics and Change, and Brill’s Annual of Afroasiatic Languages and Linguistics.


Browse Journal Calls



First Language

Call Deadline: 30-Sep-2014

Call Information:
Indigenous children's language: Acquisition, preservation and evolution of language in minority contexts

Over the last decade or so there has been a surge in interest in the acquisition of small Indigenous languages across the world. There are a few significant reasons for this growth. Firstly, indigenous languages are dying at an alarming rate, which means that now is often our last chance to study their acquisition. Secondly, there is a broad recognition among child language researchers that our theories of acquisition are skewed by the over-representation of data from large European languages (especially English), whereas many children across the world are acquiring typologically under- studied languages (e.g. polysynthetic languages), often in situations of rapid language shift.
Field studies, in contexts such as remote communities, or investigations of minority language users' development in multilingual societies will be of interest. A range of disciplinary perspectives, theoretical positions, and methodological strategies is likely to be represented in the Special Issue.

Prospective authors are encouraged to email the editors to discuss potential contributions (b.kelly@unimelb.edu.au; evan.kidd@anu.edu.au; g.wigglesworth@unimelb.edu.au). Papers should be submitted through the First Language manuscript central site (http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/fla) by 30th. September 2014.

Papers should be not more than 8000 words in length, and conform to the First Language submission guidelines.

All papers will be submitted to the normal review process.


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