Featured Linguist!

Jost Gippert: Our Featured Linguist!

"Buenos dias", "buenas noches" -- this was the first words in a foreign language I heard in my life, as a three-year old boy growing up in developing post-war Western Germany, where the first gastarbeiters had arrived from Spain. Fascinated by the strange sounds, I tried to get to know some more languages, the only opportunity being TV courses of English and French -- there was no foreign language education for pre-teen school children in Germany yet in those days. Read more



Donate Now | Visit the Fund Drive Homepage

Amount Raised:

$33668

Still Needed:

$41332

Can anyone overtake Syntax in the Subfield Challenge ?

Grad School Challenge Leader: University of Washington


Publishing Partner: Cambridge University Press CUP Extra Publisher Login
amazon logo
More Info


New from Oxford University Press!

ad

What is English? And Why Should We Care?

By: Tim William Machan

To find some answers Tim Machan explores the language's present and past, and looks ahead to its futures among the one and a half billion people who speak it. His search is fascinating and important, for definitions of English have influenced education and law in many countries and helped shape the identities of those who live in them.


New from Cambridge University Press!

ad

Medical Writing in Early Modern English

Edited by Irma Taavitsainen and Paivi Pahta

This volume provides a new perspective on the evolution of the special language of medicine, based on the electronic corpus of Early Modern English Medical Texts, containing over two million words of medical writing from 1500 to 1700.


Browse Journal Calls



Journal of Jewish Languages

Call Deadline: 31-Mar-2014

Call Information:
Call For Papers: Special issue of the Journal of Jewish Languages

Proposed Title: The role of language contact in the formation of Modern Hebrew syntax

Guest Editor: Edit Doron, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, edit.doron@mail.huji.ac.il

Time table:
- Submit title: 31/3/2014
- Submit article: 31/8/2014.

The Journal of Jewish Languages is preparing a special issue dedicated to the topic of 'The role of contact languages in the formation of Modern Hebrew syntax.' The issue will consist of several *short* articles (max 2500 words) reporting original research documenting the influence of Jewish and other contact languages on the innovation and development of particular grammatical constructions of Modern Hebrew during the early revival period. Each article will document *one particular novel construction* in the grammar of Modern Hebrew, and demonstrate whether it might have come into the language from contact languages such as Yiddish, Ladino, Arabic, Russian, etc. The articles will include documentation of the construction from the early period of the Hebrew revival (end of 19th century) and possibly from the corresponding contact language. The articles will not be theoretical, but will include a short explanation and analysis of the construction, with special attention to the linguistic and sociolinguistic patterns of development. The article will trace the origins of the construction, and its evolution within Modern Hebrew.

Articles, maximum length of 5 pages (2500 words), should be written in English, and include example sentences in Hebrew script, also glossed in IPA, translated morpheme by morpheme with an additional idiomatic translation to English. Preferably, each article will also include an appendix of additional examples in Hebrew script alone, with no translations. Each example in the paper or the appendix should include mention of its date and where it was found.

Deadline for submission: 31/8/2014. In order to find out whether their contribution is compatible with the topic of the special issue, potential authors are asked to contact the guest editor (edit.doron@mail.huji.ac.il) before 31/3/2014 with a suggested title and short one paragraph abstract (in English). The articles will be peer-reviewed according to the procedure required by the journal, and according to their relevance to the topic of the special issue.

The Journal of Jewish Languages is a peer reviewed journal published twice a year by Brill. The editors are Ofra Tirosh-Becker and Sarah Bunin Benor. For more information, see http://www.brill.com/publications/journals/journal-jewish-languages.


Back