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Words in Time and Place: Exploring Language Through the Historical Thesaurus of the Oxford English Dictionary

By David Crystal

Offers a unique view of the English language and its development, and includes witty commentary and anecdotes along the way.


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The Indo-European Controversy: Facts and Fallacies in Historical Linguistics

By Asya Pereltsvaig and Martin W. Lewis

This book "asserts that the origin and spread of languages must be examined primarily through the time-tested techniques of linguistic analysis, rather than those of evolutionary biology" and "defends traditional practices in historical linguistics while remaining open to new techniques, including computational methods" and "will appeal to readers interested in world history and world geography."


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Frontiers in Psychology

Call Deadline: 30-Nov-2014

Call Information:
Context in communication: A cognitive view

http://journal.frontiersin.org/ResearchTopic/3233

Topic Editors: Gabriella Airenti, Marco Cruciani, Alessio Plebe

Submission Deadlines: 30 November 2014 Abstract, 30 May 2015 Manuscript

Context is a controversial concept. Research in philosophy of language, linguistics and cognitive science has shown that the communicative content of an utterance cannot be limited to the conventional content of what is said. The notion of context has assumed a central role in language studies with the pragmatic turn that has shifted the focus from meaning to speaker's meaning, a change of paradigm that can be traced back to Wittgenstein's conception of language use and to the work of philosophers of language like Austin, Grice and Searle. In this framework pragmatics is the place where the intentional aspects of language use are treated. From a cognitive point of view communication is considered as an inferential process based on mental states and shared assumptions. The notion of context is then no more limited to the deictic features of an utterance referring to the spatial and temporal situation in which it occurs. All that contributes to interpret a communicative act beyond the spoken words may, broadly speaking, be included.

This can be seen as a critical point. Is this unconstrained definition of context useful? If the background for meaning is all human knowledge, and if all the aspects of human action are potentially involved, aren't we attempting, in Chomsky's words, to make the ''science of everything''? Are there ways to delimit the notion of context? Is it possible to identify different types of contexts and to make a taxonomy of them? How different types of contexts relate to each other? How is the relevant contextual knowledge acquired? How children learn to deal with different types of contexts? Etc.

In this Research Topic we intend to investigate the role of context in communication from different perspectives coming from all the areas of cognitive science. We welcome theoretical contributions, research papers as well as reviews and opinion notes.


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