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Evolutionary Syntax

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This book "outlines novel and testable hypotheses, contains extensive examples from many different languages" and is "presented in accessible language, with more technical discussion in footnotes."

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This book "proposes a new theory of contact-induced grammatical restructuring" and "offers a new analytical approach to New English from a formal or structural perspective."

Browse Journal Calls

Cultus - The Journal of Intercultural Mediation and Communication

Call Deadline: 15-Oct-2014

Call Information:
Cultus 8: The Intercultural Question and the Interpreting Professions

Call for Abstracts: October 15 2014
Call for papers: February 15 2015
Submission info at:

In Cultus 6 David Crystal said ''I don't expect my translator to be a mind-reader [...] knowing about the presuppositions and intentions underlying the utterances made by the participants''. Issues 7 and 8 will focus on this very point.

Issue 7 (2014) includes a conversation between Jeremy Munday and Yves Gambier and focuses on the translator.

Issue 8 (2015) begins with a conversation between Sandra Hale (community interpreting specialist) and Tony Liddicoat (interculturalist), and will focus on the interpreter.

To what extent do we agree or disagree with Crystal? Why should (or should not) interpreters know about and account for presuppositions and intentions of the client - particularly those based on intercultural issues?

We would like contributions that focus on these issues, and in particular on these other (non) professionals such as the volunteers (friends and family, child interpreters), the 'cowboy' subject specialists with some foreign language (or cultural) understanding; cultural mediators, …

How important are these ad hoc interpreters, and what sort of job are they doing? Can they be independent and objective, and at the same time mediate and possibly advocate?

Also what, if any, difference is there between the emerging groups and ''interpreters''; and what should the profession be doing about accounting for the unsaid, for the presuppositions and intentions underlying the utterances? The problem is crucial for all, from community/social to business/legal interpreters.

If there are moments or contexts where the interpreter can (or should) intervene, then could the term ''transcreation'' ever be used to talk about interpreting? To what extent can or should the go-between create or mediate? What are the dangers if they do? What are the dangers if they don't? And if they shouldn't mediate, is there another professional figure who should be available to do that job? And in which case what of the interpreters' future?

Cultus: double-blind review, MLA/IATIS/TSB indexed.