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Latin: A Linguistic Introduction

By Renato Oniga and Norma Shifano

Applies the principles of contemporary linguistics to the study of Latin and provides clear explanations of grammatical rules alongside diagrams to illustrate complex structures.


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The Ancient Language, and the Dialect of Cornwall, with an Enlarged Glossary of Cornish Provincial Words

By Frederick W.P. Jago

Containing around 3,700 dialect words from both Cornish and English,, this glossary was published in 1882 by Frederick W. P. Jago (1817–92) in an effort to describe and preserve the dialect as it too declined and it is an invaluable record of a disappearing dialect and way of life.


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Linguistic Bibliography for the Year 2013

The Linguistic Bibliography is by far the most comprehensive bibliographic reference work in the field. This volume contains up-to-date and extensive indexes of names, languages, and subjects.


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Frontiers in Psychology

Call Deadline: 30-Apr-2014

Call Information:
We would like to invite abstracts for a Frontiers Research Topic entitled "Learning a non-native language in a naturalistic environment: Insights from behavioural and neuroimaging research", to be published in Frontiers in Psychology, division of Language Sciences. The proposed Research Topic aims to bring together studies on the effects of learning and speaking a non-native language in a naturalistic environment. These effects may include more efficient or "native-like" processing in behavioural tasks tapping on language (lexicon, morphology, syntax), as well as changes in the brain structure and function, as revealed by neuroimaging studies.

It is largely accepted in the relevant literature that successful learning of one or more non-native languages is affected by a number of factors that are independent of the target language(s) per se; these factors include the age of acquisition (AoA) of the target language(s), the type and amount of formal instruction the learners have received, as well as the amount of language use that the learners demonstrate. Recent experimental evidence suggests that one crucial factor for efficient native-like performance in the non-native language is the amount of naturalistic exposure, or immersion, that the learners receive to that language. This can be broadly defined as the degree to which language learners use their non-native language outside the classroom and for their day-to-day activities, and usually presupposes that the learners live in an environment where their non-native language is exclusively or mostly used.

Existing literature has suggested that linguistic immersion can be beneficial for lexical and semantic acquisition in a non-native language, as well as for non-native morphological and syntactic processing. More recent evidence has also suggested that naturalistic learning of a non-native language can also have an impact on the patterns of brain activity underlying language processing, as well as on the structure of brain regions that are involved, expressed as changes in the grey matter structure.

Potential contributions could include original papers employing a variety of methods: behavioural (comprehension and production, visual and auditory, online and offline, at the word and at the sentence level), eye-tracking, neuroimaging (ERP, functional and structural MRI, MEG, TMS). Of particular interest would be longitudinal studies investigating the course of language acquisition by highly immersed learners, as well as studies looking at learners who speak non-native languages with different typology and/or alphabet to their native language.

For more information, and for submitting your contribution, please visit:

http://www.frontiersin.org/Language_Sciences/researchtopics/Learning_a_non-native_language/2118


Topic editors:

Christos Pliatsikas, University of Kent (c.pliatsikas@kent.ac.uk)
Vicky Chondrogiani, Bangor University (v.chondrogianni@bangor.ac.uk)


Deadlines

The deadline for abstract submissions is October 31st, 2013. Other relevant deadlines are listed below:

November 30th, 2013: Contributors notified by editors

April 30th, 2014: Submission of first drafts/ papers sent out to reviewers

May 20, 2014: All first round reviews in / selected papers for second round of reviews, if necessary

May 31, 2014: Contributors notified regarding independent review / interactive system open for re-submissions and interactive review process.

We look forward to receiving your contributions!


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