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Oxford Handbook of Corpus Phonology

Edited by Jacques Durand, Ulrike Gut, and Gjert Kristoffersen

Offers the first detailed examination of corpus phonology and serves as a practical guide for researchers interested in compiling or using phonological corpora


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The Languages of the Jews: A Sociolinguistic History

By Bernard Spolsky

A vivid commentary on Jewish survival and Jewish speech communities that will be enjoyed by the general reader, and is essential reading for students and researchers interested in the study of Middle Eastern languages, Jewish studies, and sociolinguistics.


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Indo-European Linguistics

New Open Access journal on Indo-European Linguistics is now available!


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Current Issues in Language Planning

Call Deadline: 05-Nov-2012

Call Information:
Second Call for Papers

Current Issues in Language Planning Journal is announcing a Call for Papers for a forthcoming issue on "Language planning and multilingual education".

The editors for this issue are Kerry Taylor-Leech and Tony Liddicoat . Please submit proposals to Kerry Taylor-Leech. It is anticipated that papers will be published in 2014.

The deadline for receipt of abstracts is 5 November, 2012.
The deadline for receipt of the final paper is 31 May, 2013.

Rapid globalisation and mass migration have ensured that ethnic, religious, linguistic and cultural diversity now characterises most societies; in fact only a handful can be described as ethnolinguistically homogenous. Many societies can now be characterised by the phenomenon known as super-diversity (Vertovec, 2007), a term describing a scale of transnational migration, sociocultural complexity and ethnolinguistic identification that has never been seen before.

Yet relatively few language education policies have attempted to accommodate multilingualism. Despite research evidence pointing to the social and cognitive benefits that accrue from multilingualism, most language education policies are oriented towards standard languages and tend to serve the interests of dominant groups rather than those of minorities. In post-colonial contexts, most policies have focused on the promotion of proficiency in the former colonial language(s) and/or a dominant local lingua franca in formal schooling.

Recent overviews of the field emphasise the distinction between macro, meso and micro level planning activities and stress the importance of human agency in language policymaking and planning. Others distinguish between top-down to bottom-up planning. This special issue hopes to bring together contributions from researchers in different geographic and linguistic contexts to explore how various actors have responded to linguistic diversity in education at macro, meso or micro levels and from top down or bottom up perspectives.

We invite papers that discuss language policy and planning responses to multilingualism in different educational settings. Contributions that make critical evaluations of language policy and its implementation in any sector of education in any part of the world are welcome, as are papers that deal with standard, non-standard, heritage, indigenous, community and immigrant languages, minority and/or contact languages in education.

Vertovec, Steven. 2007. Super-diversity and its implications. Ethnic and Racial Studies 30, 6, pp. 1024-1054.


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