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The Social Origins of Language

By Daniel Dor

Presents a new theoretical framework for the origins of human language and sets key issues in language evolution in their wider context within biological and cultural evolution


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Preposition Placement in English: A Usage-Based Approach

By Thomas Hoffmann

This is the first study that empirically investigates preposition placement across all clause types. The study compares first-language (British English) and second-language (Kenyan English) data and will therefore appeal to readers interested in world Englishes. Over 100 authentic corpus examples are discussed in the text, which will appeal to those who want to see 'real data'


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Free access to several Brill linguistics journals, such as Journal of Jewish Languages, Language Dynamics and Change, and Brill’s Annual of Afroasiatic Languages and Linguistics.


Academic Paper


Title: Asinlised English and the Gender: Its Manifestation in Selected Nigerian Users
Author: Oluwayomi Sefiu Oladunjoye
Email: click here to access email
Institution: Olabisi Onabanjo University, Ago-Iwoye
Author: Oluwakemi Olayemi
Email: click here to access email
Linguistic Field: Applied Linguistics; Sociolinguistics
Abstract: This study investigates the basic facts involved in speech processing and the consequences of such processes on actual verbal production with particular attention on the young Nigerians as they think in their mother tongue and speak in the English Language. Different participants were used at different periods (2005 and 2007) respectively. The former were fifty-four (54) while the latter were one hundred and forty (140) all of whom are Nigerian undergraduates and are adolescents free from obvious speech defects. Thirty-six (36) speech samples representing dialogues and monologues of the fifty-four (54) participants both formal and informal settings were recorded on tape. While questionnaires were given out to the one hundred and forty (140) participants in the latter research. The statistics instrument used is simple frequency counts and percentage. The findings reveal that filled pauses hold certain semantic implications for speech events. The results of the investigation also show that certain fillers are peculiar in the speech of the Nigerian speakers of English. Such fillers or filled pauses are different from the existing known types that various researchers in other cultures have often talked about. The implication of this is that fillers may vary from culture to culture. The appearance of these kinds of fillers suggests the emergence of another ‘kind’ of Nigerian English. The fact that a particular set of young people employ this new ‘kinds’ of fillers more often as is revealed in this research may of course have further implication for future research.
Type: Collection
Status: In Progress
Venue: Nigeria
Publication Info: Intended for publication in one of the Linguists Journals


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