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Latin: A Linguistic Introduction

By Renato Oniga and Norma Shifano

Applies the principles of contemporary linguistics to the study of Latin and provides clear explanations of grammatical rules alongside diagrams to illustrate complex structures.


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The Ancient Language, and the Dialect of Cornwall, with an Enlarged Glossary of Cornish Provincial Words

By Frederick W.P. Jago

Containing around 3,700 dialect words from both Cornish and English,, this glossary was published in 1882 by Frederick W. P. Jago (1817–92) in an effort to describe and preserve the dialect as it too declined and it is an invaluable record of a disappearing dialect and way of life.


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Linguistic Bibliography for the Year 2013

The Linguistic Bibliography is by far the most comprehensive bibliographic reference work in the field. This volume contains up-to-date and extensive indexes of names, languages, and subjects.


Academic Paper


Title: Cross-Linguistic Influence on Brain Activation During Second Language Processing: An fMRI study
Author: Hyeonjeong Jeong
Email: click here to access email
Institution: Tohoku University
Author: Motoaki Sugiura
Institution: Tohoku University
Author: Yuko Sassa
Institution: Tohoku University
Author: Satoru Yokoyama
Institution: Tohoku University
Author: Kaoru Horie
Institution: Tohoku University
Author: Shigeru Sato
Institution: Tohoku University
Author: Masato Taira
Institution: Nihon University 日本大学
Author: Ryuta Kawashima
Institution: Tohoku University
Linguistic Field: Language Acquisition; Neurolinguistics
Abstract: The goal of this study was to examine the effect of the linguistic distance between a first language (L1) and a second language (L2) on neural activity during second language relative to first language processing. We compared different L1–L2 pairs in which different linguistic features characterize linguistic distance. Chinese and Korean native speakers were instructed to perform sentence comprehension tasks in two L2s (English and Japanese) and their respective L1s. Activation while understanding English sentences relative to understanding sentences in L1 was greater for the Korean group than the Chinese group in the left inferior frontal gyrus, bilateral posterior superior temporal gyri, and right cerebellum. Activation while understanding Japanese sentences relative to understanding sentences in L1 was greater for the Chinese group than the Korean group in the anterior portion of the left superior temporal gyrus. The results demonstrated that the location of the L2–L1 processing-induced cortical activation varies between different L1–L2 pairs.

CUP at LINGUIST

This article appears in Bilingualism: Language and Cognition Vol. 10, Issue 2, which you can read on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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