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Oxford Handbook of Corpus Phonology

Edited by Jacques Durand, Ulrike Gut, and Gjert Kristoffersen

Offers the first detailed examination of corpus phonology and serves as a practical guide for researchers interested in compiling or using phonological corpora


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The Languages of the Jews: A Sociolinguistic History

By Bernard Spolsky

A vivid commentary on Jewish survival and Jewish speech communities that will be enjoyed by the general reader, and is essential reading for students and researchers interested in the study of Middle Eastern languages, Jewish studies, and sociolinguistics.


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Indo-European Linguistics

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Academic Paper


Title: Oral Reading in Bilingual Aphasia: Evidence from Mongolian and Chinese
Author: Brendan Stuart Weekes
Institution: University of Sussex
Author: I Fan Su
Institution: University of Sussex
Author: Wengang Yin
Institution: Chinese Academy of Science
Author: Xihong Zhang
Institution: Tongliao People's Hospital
Linguistic Field: Neurolinguistics; Psycholinguistics; Writing Systems
Abstract: Cognitive neuropsychological studies of bilingual patients with aphasia have contributed to our understanding of how the brain processes different languages. The question we asked is whether differences in script have any impact on language processing in bilingual aphasic patients who speak languages with different writing systems: Chinese and Mongolian. We observed a pattern of greater impairment to written word comprehension and oral reading in L2 (Chinese) than in L1 (Mongolian) for two patients. We argue that differences in script have only a minimal effect on written word processing in bilingual aphasia when the age of acquisition, word frequency and imageability of lexical items is controlled. Our conclusion is that reading of familiar words in Mongolian and Chinese might not require independent cognitive systems or brain regions.

CUP at LINGUIST

This article appears in Bilingualism: Language and Cognition Vol. 10, Issue 2, which you can read on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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