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Latin: A Linguistic Introduction

By Renato Oniga and Norma Shifano

Applies the principles of contemporary linguistics to the study of Latin and provides clear explanations of grammatical rules alongside diagrams to illustrate complex structures.


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The Ancient Language, and the Dialect of Cornwall, with an Enlarged Glossary of Cornish Provincial Words

By Frederick W.P. Jago

Containing around 3,700 dialect words from both Cornish and English,, this glossary was published in 1882 by Frederick W. P. Jago (1817–92) in an effort to describe and preserve the dialect as it too declined and it is an invaluable record of a disappearing dialect and way of life.


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Linguistic Bibliography for the Year 2013

The Linguistic Bibliography is by far the most comprehensive bibliographic reference work in the field. This volume contains up-to-date and extensive indexes of names, languages, and subjects.


Academic Paper


Title: Plant Metaphors for the Expression of Emotions in the English Language
Author: Orazgozel Esenova
Email: click here to access email
Linguistic Field: Discipline of Linguistics; Semantics
Subject Language: English
Abstract: One of the most fundamental human experiences is that of agriculture. Plants we grow provide our basic needs in shelter, food, medicines, clothing etc. Despite this, the role of the human experience of plants in emotion conceptualization has not been studied satisfactorily in cognitive linguistics. Therefore the paper aims to narrow this gap. The main focus of the article is the EMOTIONS ARE PLANTS metaphor. In this metaphor, stages of plant growth are systematically mapped onto the stages of emotion development. The stages of plant growth that are mapped onto the stages of emotion development are: seed, germination, budding, flowering, fruition and withering. Furthermore, the study shows that some emotions and states like acquaintance, friendship and love are understood in terms of the different stages of plant growth. This means that in the folk belief, they are viewed as different points lying of the same continuum of development and not as entirely different states. The study also sheds some light on the experiential basis of the metaphor under consideration.
Type: Individual Paper
Status: In Progress
Publication Info: Beyond Philology, An International Journal of Linguistics, Literary Studies and English Language Teaching, 5th issue, pp.7-21


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