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May I Quote You on That?

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A guide to English grammar and usage for the twenty-first century, pairing grammar rules with interesting and humorous quotations from American popular culture.

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Academic Paper

Title: Intonational diglossia: a case study of Glasgow
Author: Alan Cruttenden
Institution: Oxford University Phonetics Laboratory
Linguistic Field: Phonetics; Phonology; Sociolinguistics
Subject Language: English
Abstract: Auditory and acoustic data were produced from recordings of a Glaswegian English speaker in conversational and reading modes. Clearly different intonational systems were used in the two modes. The reading style used an intonation similar to that used in standard British intonation (the intonation of ‘Received Pronunciation’ (RPI)). The conversational style was an example of the type of intonation used in a number of cities in the north of the UK (Urban North British Intonation (UNBI)), characterised by a default intonation involving rising or rising-slumping nuclear pitch patterns. This speaker illustrates a clear-cut case of intonational diglossia with a falling default tune in the one mode and a rising(-falling) default tune in the other.


This article appears IN Journal of the International Phonetic Association Vol. 37, Issue 3, which you can READ on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .

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