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Language Planning as a Sociolinguistic Experiment

By: Ernst Jahr

Provides richly detailed insight into the uniqueness of the Norwegian language development. Marks the 200th anniversary of the birth of the Norwegian nation following centuries of Danish rule


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Acquiring Phonology: A Cross-Generational Case-Study

By Neil Smith

The study also highlights the constructs of current linguistic theory, arguing for distinctive features and the notion 'onset' and against some of the claims of Optimality Theory and Usage-based accounts.


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Language Production and Interpretation: Linguistics meets Cognition

By Henk Zeevat

The importance of Henk Zeevat's new monograph cannot be overstated. [...] I recommend it to anyone who combines interests in language, logic, and computation [...]. David Beaver, University of Texas at Austin


Academic Paper


Title: Auxiliary fronting in Peranakan Javanese
Author: PeterCole
Email: click here to access email
Homepage: http://www.ling.udel.edu/pcole/cole.html
Institution: University of Delaware
Author: YurieHara
Email: click here to access email
Homepage: http://ling.bun.kyoto-u.ac.jp/~yhara/
Institution: Kyoto University
Author: Ngee ThaiYap
Institution: University Putra Malaysia
Linguistic Field: Syntax
Subject Language: Javanese
Abstract: Peranakan Javanese (PNJ) is a relatively undescribed variety of Javanese spoken primarily by ethnic Chinese native speakers of Javanese in the city of Semarang in Central Java (Indonesia). PNJ makes a structural distinction between auxiliaries and main verbs. Auxiliaries are unique in that they undergo optional head movement to C. Not only do single auxiliaries move to C, as in familiar languages, but sequences of two or three auxiliaries can move to C as well. Significantly, the order of the moved auxiliaries is always the same as the order in their unmoved position. The distribution of auxiliaries in PNJ is predicted if a 'tucking in' (Richards 1997) analysis of head movement similar to that of Collins (2002) is adopted. The PNJ facts are of special interest not only because they are an example of an additional language/construction that shows the distribution expected on the basis of 'tucking in', but also because PNJ provides evidence that helps to distinguish between a analysis and the 'standard' version of the analysis, in which adverbs occupy fixed positions in the clause. It is quite difficult to distinguish between these approaches empirically, so the PNJ auxiliary facts are important in this regard.

CUP at LINGUIST

This article appears in Journal of Linguistics Vol. 44, Issue 1, which you can read on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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