Publishing Partner: Cambridge University Press CUP Extra Publisher Login

New from Cambridge University Press!

ad

Voice Quality

By John H. Esling, Scott R. Moisik, Allison Benner, Lise Crevier-Buchman

Voice Quality "The first description of voice quality production in forty years, this book provides a new framework for its study: The Laryngeal Articulator Model. Informed by instrumental examinations of the laryngeal articulatory mechanism, it revises our understanding of articulatory postures to explain the actions, vibrations and resonances generated in the epilarynx and pharynx."


New from Oxford University Press!

ad

Let's Talk

By David Crystal

Let's Talk "Explores the factors that motivate so many different kinds of talk and reveals the rules we use unconsciously, even in the most routine exchanges of everyday conversation."


We Have a New Site!

With the help of your donations we have been making good progress on designing and launching our new website! Check it out at https://linguistlist.org/!
***We are still in our beta stages for the new site--if you have any feedback, be sure to let us know at webdevlinguistlist.org***

Academic Paper


Title: Seeing as though
Author: John R. Taylor
Email: click here TO access email
Institution: University of Otago
Author: Kam-Yiu S. Pang
Email: click here TO access email
Institution: University of Macau
Linguistic Field: Pragmatics; Semantics; Text/Corpus Linguistics
Subject Language: English
Abstract: In this article we address a hitherto unstudied causal conjunction in English, 'seeing as though'. Occurring predominantly in informal registers, the conjunction is typically used to introduce information which the speaker takes to be self-evidently true and on whose basis some further comment, or query, is made. Drawing on data derived from internet searches we draw up a semantic profile of the expression in comparison and contrast with other reason connectives, namely, 'seeing (that)' and 'since'. The data suggest that 'seeing as though' is associated with highly subjective construals of the reason relation. We also address the internal structure of the expression. The use of 'seeing' in a reason conjunction is traced to a common conceptual metaphor, whereby knowing is seeing. More puzzling is the occurrence of 'as though'. While rejecting the possibility of a compositional analysis of the expression, we note that 'as though' is only one of a number of items which can occur with causal 'seeing'. These items have to do with the appearance of things and are in fact able to occur as complementizers after predicates of seeming and appearing. To this extent, 'as though' is consistent with the subjectivity associated with the complex conjunction. In the course of our investigation, we also document the extraordinary proliferation of reason connectives that involve lexical items such as 'seeing', 'as', 'though', and several others, and suggest that this exuberance of new forms may not be unrelated to the subjectivity inherent in the construal of causal relations.

CUP AT LINGUIST

This article appears IN English Language and Linguistics Vol. 12, Issue 1.

Return to TOC.

Add a new paper
Return to Academic Papers main page
Return to Directory of Linguists main page