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The Social Origins of Language

By Daniel Dor

Presents a new theoretical framework for the origins of human language and sets key issues in language evolution in their wider context within biological and cultural evolution


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Preposition Placement in English: A Usage-Based Approach

By Thomas Hoffmann

This is the first study that empirically investigates preposition placement across all clause types. The study compares first-language (British English) and second-language (Kenyan English) data and will therefore appeal to readers interested in world Englishes. Over 100 authentic corpus examples are discussed in the text, which will appeal to those who want to see 'real data'


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Free Access 4 You

Free access to several Brill linguistics journals, such as Journal of Jewish Languages, Language Dynamics and Change, and Brill’s Annual of Afroasiatic Languages and Linguistics.


Academic Paper


Title: What's in a word? Morphological awareness and vocabulary knowledge in three languages
Author: Catherine McBride-Chang
Institution: Chinese University of Hong Kong
Author: Twila Tardif
Institution: University of Michigan
Author: Jeung-Ryeul Cho
Institution: Kyungnam University
Author: Hua Shu
Institution: Beijing Normal University
Author: Paul Fletcher
Institution: University College Cork
Author: Stephanie F. Stokes
Institution: University of Canterbury
Author: Anita M. Y. Wong
Institution: University of Hong Kong
Author: Kawai Leung
Institution: Chinese University of Hong Kong
Linguistic Field: Language Acquisition; Psycholinguistics
Subject Language: Chinese, Yue
Chinese, Mandarin
Korean
Abstract: Understanding how words are created is potentially a key component to being able to learn and understand new vocabulary words. However, research on morphological awareness is relatively rare. In this study, over 660 preschool-aged children from three language groups (Cantonese, Mandarin, and Korean speakers) in which compounding morphology is highly prevalent were tested on their abilities to manipulate familiar morphemes to create novel compound words as well as on a variety of early language and reasoning measures twice over the span of 9 months to 1 year. With Time 1 vocabulary knowledge, phonological processing, and reasoning skills controlled, morphological awareness predicted unique variance in Time 2 vocabulary knowledge across languages. Across languages, vocabulary knowledge also predicted unique variance in subsequent morphological awareness, with Time 1 morphological awareness controlled. Findings underscore the bidirectional bootstrapping of morphological awareness and vocabulary acquisition for languages in which lexical compounding is prominent, and suggest that morphological awareness may be practically important in predicting and fostering children's early vocabulary learning.

CUP at LINGUIST

This article appears in Applied Psycholinguistics Vol. 29, Issue 3, which you can read on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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