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Academic Paper


Title: The processing of German word stress: evidence for the prosodic hierarchy
Author: Ulrike Domahs
Institution: University of Marburg
Author: Richard Wiese
Email: click here TO access email
Institution: Philipps-Universit├Ąt Marburg
Author: Ina Bornkessel-Schlesewsky
Institution: Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences
Author: Matthias Schlesewsky
Institution: Johannes Gutenberg-Universit├Ąt Mainz
Linguistic Field: Phonology
Subject Language: German
Abstract: The present paper explores whether the metrical foot is necessary for the description of prosodic systems. To this end, we present empirical findings on the perception of German word stress using event-related brain potentials as the dependent measure. A manipulation of the main stress position within three-syllable words revealed differential brain responses, which (a) correlated with the reorganisation of syllables into feet in stress violations, and (b) differed in strength depending on syllable weight. The experiments therefore provide evidence that the processing of word stress not only involves lexical information about stress positions, but also (quantity-sensitive) information about metrical structures, in particular feet and syllables.

CUP AT LINGUIST

This article appears IN Phonology Vol. 25, Issue 1, which you can READ on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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