Publishing Partner: Cambridge University Press CUP Extra Publisher Login
amazon logo
More Info


New from Oxford University Press!

ad

Words in Time and Place: Exploring Language Through the Historical Thesaurus of the Oxford English Dictionary

By David Crystal

Offers a unique view of the English language and its development, and includes witty commentary and anecdotes along the way.


New from Cambridge University Press!

ad

The Indo-European Controversy: Facts and Fallacies in Historical Linguistics

By Asya Pereltsvaig and Martin W. Lewis

This book "asserts that the origin and spread of languages must be examined primarily through the time-tested techniques of linguistic analysis, rather than those of evolutionary biology" and "defends traditional practices in historical linguistics while remaining open to new techniques, including computational methods" and "will appeal to readers interested in world history and world geography."


Academic Paper


Title: Review of Research on Language Teaching, Learning and Policy Published in 2007
Author: Richard Johnstone
Institution: University of Stirling
Linguistic Field: Discipline of Linguistics
Abstract: My research review of 2007 is somewhat shorter than in earlier years in order to allow space for the journal's impressively increased number of other articles. This naturally adds to my problems of selection, especially as 2007 witnessed the welcome appearance of new international journals in the form of Innovation in Language Learning & Teaching and a considerably re-vamped Language Learning Journal. Accordingly, my selection of articles is not intended as a representative sample of the Applied Linguistics field but should be taken as a personal judgement based on attempting an appropriate range of the following: journals, languages, topics, countries, institutional settings, levels of proficiency, learner age, theory, practice, and personal interest. My selection is organised under a number of headings, but these offer only a general clue as to what a particular article is about, since most articles reviewed have reverberations across a number of headings rather than one alone. In addition, what I say about a particular article is not meant to be a summary. Those wishing to see a summary should go to the article itself and read its abstract. My account of a particular article may in fact reflect only one theme within the article which I have chosen to highlight.

CUP AT LINGUIST

This article appears IN Language Teaching Vol. 42, Issue 3, which you can READ on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



Add a new paper
Return to Academic Papers main page
Return to Directory of Linguists main page