Publishing Partner: Cambridge University Press CUP Extra Wiley-Blackwell Publisher Login
amazon logo
More Info


New from Oxford University Press!

ad

Language Planning as a Sociolinguistic Experiment

By: Ernst Jahr

Provides richly detailed insight into the uniqueness of the Norwegian language development. Marks the 200th anniversary of the birth of the Norwegian nation following centuries of Danish rule


New from Cambridge University Press!

ad

Acquiring Phonology: A Cross-Generational Case-Study

By Neil Smith

The study also highlights the constructs of current linguistic theory, arguing for distinctive features and the notion 'onset' and against some of the claims of Optimality Theory and Usage-based accounts.


New from Brill!

ad

Language Production and Interpretation: Linguistics meets Cognition

By Henk Zeevat

The importance of Henk Zeevat's new monograph cannot be overstated. [...] I recommend it to anyone who combines interests in language, logic, and computation [...]. David Beaver, University of Texas at Austin


Academic Paper


Title: 'Phonological Variation and Change in Australian and New Zealand Sign Languages: The location variable'
Author: AdamC.Schembri
Email: click here to access email
Homepage: 'http://www.dcal.ucl.ac.uk/team/adam_schembri.html'
Institution: 'La Trobe University'
Author: DavidMcKee
Email: click here to access email
Institution: 'Victoria University of Wellington'
Author: RachelMcKee
Email: click here to access email
Homepage: 'http://www.victoria.ac.nz/lals/about/staff/rachel-mckee'
Institution: 'Victoria University of Wellington'
Author: SaraPivac
Institution: 'Victoria University of Wellington'
Author: TrevorJohnston
Institution: 'Macquarie University'
Author: DellaGoswell
Institution: 'Macquarie University'
Linguistic Field: 'Phonetics; Phonology; Sociolinguistics'
Subject Language: 'Australian Sign Language'
' New Zealand Sign Language'
Abstract: In this study, we consider variation in a class of signs in Australian and New Zealand Sign Languages that includes the signs think, name, and clever. In their citation form, these signs are specified for a place of articulation at or near the signer's forehead or above, but are sometimes produced at lower locations. An analysis of 2667 tokens collected from 205 deaf signers in five sites across Australia and of 2096 tokens collected from 138 deaf signers from three regions in New Zealand indicates that location variation in these signs reflects both linguistic and social factors, as also reported for American Sign Language (Lucas, Bayley, & Valli, 2001). Despite similarities, however, we find that some of the particular factors at work, and the kinds of influence they have, appear to differ in these three signed languages. Moreover, our results suggest that lexical frequency may also play a role.

CUP at LINGUIST

This article appears in Language Variation and Change Vol. 21, Issue 2, which you can read on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



Back
Add a new paper
Return to Academic Papers main page
Return to Directory of Linguists main page