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Academic Paper


Title: Orthographic influences, vocabulary development, and phonological awareness in deaf children who use cochlear implants
Author: Deborah James
Institution: University of Newcastle upon Tyne
Author: Kaukab Rajput
Institution: University College London
Author: Julie Brinton
Institution: Institute of Sound and Vibration Research
Author: Usha Goswami
Institution: University of Cambridge
Linguistic Field: Phonology; Psycholinguistics
Abstract: In the current study, we explore the influence of orthographic knowledge on phonological awareness in children with cochlear implants and compare developmental associations to those found for hearing children matched for word reading level or chronological age. We show an influence of orthographic knowledge on syllable and phoneme awareness in deaf and hearing children, but no orthographic effect on rhyme awareness. Nonorthographic rhyme awareness was a significant predictor of reading outcomes for all groups. However, whereas receptive vocabulary knowledge was the most important predictor of word reading variance in the cochlear implant group, rhyme awareness was the only important predictor of word reading variance in the reading level matched hearing group. Both vocabulary and rhyme awareness were equally important in predicting reading in the chronological age-matched hearing group. The data suggest that both deaf and hearing children are influenced by orthography when making phonological judgments, and that phonological awareness and vocabulary are both important for reading development.

CUP AT LINGUIST

This article appears IN Applied Psycholinguistics Vol. 30, Issue 4, which you can READ on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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