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Academic Paper


Title: Second-person pronoun use in French language discussion fora
Author: Lawrence Williams
Email: click here TO access email
Homepage: http://www.forl.unt.edu/~lfw/
Institution: University of North Texas
Author: Rémi A van Compernolle
Email: click here TO access email
Homepage: http://www.personal.psu.edu/rav137/
Institution: Carnegie Mellon University
Linguistic Field: Text/Corpus Linguistics
Subject Language: French
Abstract: This article examines the use of second-person pronouns in on-line French language discussion fora, with specific focus on Doctissimo and Meilleur du chef, two fora from which approximately 400,000 words were collected for this corpus. Two hundred discussion threads (i.e., series of linked postings), with a minimum of fifteen postings (i.e., messages) and a maximum of twenty per thread, were analysed in three different ways in order to determine whether tu, vous-singular, or neither could be considered the default address pronoun. The results of the analysis suggest that while tu is clearly preferred in many cases, its use has not become systematic.

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This article appears IN Journal of French Language Studies Vol. 19, Issue 3, which you can READ on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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