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Oxford Handbook of Corpus Phonology

Edited by Jacques Durand, Ulrike Gut, and Gjert Kristoffersen

Offers the first detailed examination of corpus phonology and serves as a practical guide for researchers interested in compiling or using phonological corpora


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The Languages of the Jews: A Sociolinguistic History

By Bernard Spolsky

A vivid commentary on Jewish survival and Jewish speech communities that will be enjoyed by the general reader, and is essential reading for students and researchers interested in the study of Middle Eastern languages, Jewish studies, and sociolinguistics.


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Indo-European Linguistics

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Academic Paper


Title: Caribbean Languages and Caribbean Linguistics
Author: Jo-Anne S. Ferreira
Email: click here to access email
Homepage: http://sta.uwi.edu/fhe/dmll/JSFerreira.asp
Institution: University of the West Indies at St. Augustine
Linguistic Field: Sociolinguistics
Abstract: Of the 1,000 plus languages of the Americas, 70 are in use across the 29 territories of the Caribbean, including both the archipelago and continental rimlands (Allsopp 1996). Linguistic situations of the Caribbean are complex, with language users managing an interface between and among a variety of languages, each with its own social status, and some with both national and official status. Linguistic groupings include indigenous Amerindian languages, European languages, creole languages, sign languages (indigenous and foreign), and immigrant languages of various origins, including religious languages. With regard to European languages and creole languages, the relationships are varied, intense and often appear to be problematic. In addition to the complexity of the living languages, their varieties and the often overlapping communities of practice to which their speakers belong, there are a number of languages in various stages of obsolescence. Some are almost totally extinct, and some moribund, with few, if any, young native speakers. Caribbean(ist) linguists have been engaged in the analysis and documentation of these languages and language situations for several decades, many pioneering work in hitherto neglected areas. These linguistics studies have an immediate application to formal education, language and language education policies, sustainable and ongoing language and culture development, communication, issues of identity, heritage and ethnicity, nation-building, linguistic rights and discrimination and language revitalisation. To understand human language as an integral and inseparable part of human culture is to begin to understand human and issues of social and cultural identity. This is the work of linguists in the Caribbean and beyond.
Type: Individual Paper
Status: Completed
Venue: Kingston: UWI Press, 2012
Publication Info: Caribbean Heritage: A Source Book, ed. Basil Reid


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