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Vowel Length From Latin to Romance

By Michele Loporcaro

This book "draws on extensive empirical data, including from lesser known varieties" and "puts forward a new account of a well-known diachronic phenomenon."


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Letter Writing and Language Change

Edited By Anita Auer, Daniel Schreier, and Richard J. Watts

This book "challenges the assumption that there is only one 'legitimate' and homogenous form of English or of any other language" and "supports the view of different/alternative histories of the English language and will appeal to readers who are skeptical of 'standard' language ideology."


Academic Paper


Title: Language PolIcy and the Speakers' Needs: What Is the RelatIonshIp between RelIgIon, Myth and LInguIstIc Culture?
Paper URL: http://www.sosyalarastirmalar.com/sosyalarastirmalar_english/index_eng.htm
Author: Iman Tohidian
Email: click here TO access email
Institution: University of Kashan
Author: Ezatollah Tohidian
Email: click here TO access email
Linguistic Field: Applied Linguistics; Cognitive Science; Language Acquisition; Linguistic Theories; Psycholinguistics
Abstract: One of the most basic issues where language and religion intersect is the existence, in many cultures, of sacred texts, sometimes composed in hieratic languages that are used for religious purposes only. [1] For cultures where certain texts are so revered, there is often almost an identity of language and religion, such that the language of the texts also becomes sacred, and must be controlled, kept pure, kept out of the wrong hands (or wrong ears), and may even become the monopoly and source of livelihood for a hereditary priesthood. In this paper we are going to conclude that in linguistic cultures with ancient religious traditions, especially textual traditions, there are often ideas about language and its origin, its purpose, and its sanctity embodied in the religious tradition. And just as these textual traditions often consist of accretions of earlier and later material, and just as different portions of the text may contradict each other, we may find that language policies themselves consist of many parts, some explicit and overt, some implicit and covert. Often the overt policy is a later attempt to make sense of earlier cultural rule-making about language, but we would hold that it never succeeds in superseding the underlying ideas about language.
Type: Individual Paper
Status: Completed
Venue: ISSN: 1307 -9581
Publication Info: VOLUME 3 ISSUE 10 WINTER 2010
URL: http://www.sosyalarastirmalar.com/sosyalarastirmalar_english/index_eng.htm


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