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Academic Paper


Title: Negation in Montana Salish
Author: Nico Baier
Email: click here TO access email
Institution: University of Michigan
Author: Dibella Wdzenczny
Email: click here TO access email
Institution: University of California, Santa Barbara
Linguistic Field: Morphology; Semantics; Syntax
Subject Language: Kalispel-Pend d'Oreille
Abstract: There are two negators in Montana Salish, ta and tam. This paper will be concerned with two basic questions: a) In what environments are the two negators found, and, if they can be determined, what factors condition the use of one negator over the other?, and b) Is this type of system found in other Salish languages? How did the distinction between ta and tam arise? For a), we argue that there are two main factors conditioning the choice of negator: 1) the type of predicate being negated and 2) the aspectual form of the predicate. For b), it seems that there are similar systems in Kalispel and Spokane, dialects of the same language of Montana Salish. Also, the Montana Salish negator tam appears to be cognate with the Tillamook negative existential taw, as noted by Davis (2005).
Type: Individual Paper
Status: Completed
Venue: University of British Columbia Working Papers in Linguistics, Volume 23
Publication Info: Proceedings from the International Conference on Salish and Neighboring Languages 43 (2008)


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