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Evolutionary Syntax

By Ljiljana Progovac

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The Making of Vernacular Singapore English

By Zhiming Bao

This book "proposes a new theory of contact-induced grammatical restructuring" and "offers a new analytical approach to New English from a formal or structural perspective."

Academic Paper

Title: “She thinks you’re kawaii”: Socializing affect, gender, and relationships in a Japanese preschool
Author: Matthew Burdelski
Author: Koji Mitsuhashi
Linguistic Field: Sociolinguistics
Subject Language: Japanese
Abstract: Kawaii, an adjective meaning ‘cute’, ‘adorable’, and ‘lovable’, is an important aspect of Japanese material culture and a key affect word used to describe things that are small, delicate, and immature. While “cuteness” has been widely discussed in relation to Japanese society and psychology and the globalization of Japanese culture, there has been little analysis of the word kawaii in interaction. This article explores the use of kawaii in interaction in a Japanese preschool. In particular, it analyzes ways teachers use multimodal resources, including talk, embodied actions, material objects, and participation frameworks, in making assessments of things in the social world and in “glossing” children’s actions as thoughts and feelings, and it examines children’s emerging use of kawaii with teachers and peers. The findings shed light on ways everyday communicative practices shape children’s understandings and use of language in relation to affect, gender, and relationships in preschool.


This article appears IN Language in Society Vol. 39, Issue 1, which you can READ on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .

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