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The Social Origins of Language

By Daniel Dor

Presents a new theoretical framework for the origins of human language and sets key issues in language evolution in their wider context within biological and cultural evolution


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Preposition Placement in English: A Usage-Based Approach

By Thomas Hoffmann

This is the first study that empirically investigates preposition placement across all clause types. The study compares first-language (British English) and second-language (Kenyan English) data and will therefore appeal to readers interested in world Englishes. Over 100 authentic corpus examples are discussed in the text, which will appeal to those who want to see 'real data'


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Free Access 4 You

Free access to several Brill linguistics journals, such as Journal of Jewish Languages, Language Dynamics and Change, and Brill’s Annual of Afroasiatic Languages and Linguistics.


Academic Paper


Title: Morphological facilitation for regular and irregular verb formations in native and non-native speakers: Little evidence for two distinct mechanisms
Author: Laurie Beth Feldman
Email: click here to access email
Institution: State University of New York at Albany
Author: Aleksandar Kostic
Institution: University of Belgrade
Author: Dana M Basnight-Brown
Institution: State University of New York at Albany
Author: Dusica Filipovic Durdevic
Institution: University of Belgrade
Author: Matthew John Pastizzo
Institution: State University of New York at Geneseo
Linguistic Field: Language Acquisition; Psycholinguistics
Subject Language: English
Abstract: The authors compared performance on two variants of the primed lexical decision task to investigate morphological processing in native and non-native speakers of English. They examined patterns of facilitation on present tense targets. Primes were regular (billed–) past tense formations and two types of irregular past tense forms that varied on preservation of target length (fell–; taught–). When a forward mask preceded the prime (Exp. 1), language and prime type interacted. Native speakers showed reliable and facilitation relative to orthographic controls. Non-native speakers' latencies after morphological and orthographic primes did not differ reliably except for regulars. Under cross-modal conditions (Exp. 2), language and prime type interacted. Native but not non-native speakers showed inhibition following orthographically similar primes. Collectively, reliable facilitation for regulars and patterns across verb type and task provided little support for a processing dichotomy (decomposition, non-combinatorial association) based on inflectional regularity in either native or non-native speakers of English.

CUP at LINGUIST

This article appears in Bilingualism: Language and Cognition Vol. 13, Issue 2, which you can read on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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