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Language Planning as a Sociolinguistic Experiment

By: Ernst Jahr

Provides richly detailed insight into the uniqueness of the Norwegian language development. Marks the 200th anniversary of the birth of the Norwegian nation following centuries of Danish rule


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Acquiring Phonology: A Cross-Generational Case-Study

By Neil Smith

The study also highlights the constructs of current linguistic theory, arguing for distinctive features and the notion 'onset' and against some of the claims of Optimality Theory and Usage-based accounts.


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Language Production and Interpretation: Linguistics meets Cognition

By Henk Zeevat

The importance of Henk Zeevat's new monograph cannot be overstated. [...] I recommend it to anyone who combines interests in language, logic, and computation [...]. David Beaver, University of Texas at Austin


Academic Paper


Title: 'Morphological facilitation for regular and irregular verb formations in native and non-native speakers: Little evidence for two distinct mechanisms'
Author: LaurieBethFeldman
Email: click here to access email
Institution: 'State University of New York at Albany'
Author: AleksandarKostic
Institution: 'University of Belgrade'
Author: DanaMBasnight-Brown
Institution: 'State University of New York at Albany'
Author: DusicaFilipovicDurdevic
Institution: 'University of Belgrade'
Author: MatthewJohnPastizzo
Institution: 'State University of New York at Geneseo'
Linguistic Field: 'Language Acquisition; Psycholinguistics'
Subject Language: 'English'
Abstract: The authors compared performance on two variants of the primed lexical decision task to investigate morphological processing in native and non-native speakers of English. They examined patterns of facilitation on present tense targets. Primes were regular (billed–) past tense formations and two types of irregular past tense forms that varied on preservation of target length (fell–; taught–). When a forward mask preceded the prime (Exp. 1), language and prime type interacted. Native speakers showed reliable and facilitation relative to orthographic controls. Non-native speakers' latencies after morphological and orthographic primes did not differ reliably except for regulars. Under cross-modal conditions (Exp. 2), language and prime type interacted. Native but not non-native speakers showed inhibition following orthographically similar primes. Collectively, reliable facilitation for regulars and patterns across verb type and task provided little support for a processing dichotomy (decomposition, non-combinatorial association) based on inflectional regularity in either native or non-native speakers of English.

CUP at LINGUIST

This article appears in Bilingualism: Language and Cognition Vol. 13, Issue 2, which you can read on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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