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Academic Paper


Title: Oral Feedback in Classroom SLA
Author: Roy Lyster
Institution: McGill University
Author: Kazuya Saito
Email: click here TO access email
Institution: Waseda University
Linguistic Field: Applied Linguistics; Language Acquisition
Abstract: To investigate the pedagogical effectiveness of oral corrective feedback (CF) on target language development, we conducted a meta-analysis that focused exclusively on 15 classroom-based studies (N = 827). The analysis was designed to investigate whether CF was effective in classroom settings and, if so, whether its effectiveness varied according to (a) types of CF, (b) types and timing of outcome measures, (c) instructional setting (second vs. foreign language classroom), (d) treatment length, and (e) learners’ age. Results revealed that CF had significant and durable effects on target language development. The effects were larger for prompts than recasts and most apparent in measures that elicit free constructed responses. Whereas instructional setting was not identified as a contributing factor to CF effectiveness, effects of long treatments were larger than those of short-to-medium treatments but not distinguishable from those of brief treatments. A simple regression analysis revealed effects for age, with younger learners benefiting from CF more than older learners.

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This article appears IN Studies in Second Language Acquisition Vol. 32, Issue 2, which you can READ on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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