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Academic Paper


Title: Inshallah: Religious invocations in Arabic topic transition
Author: Rebecca Clift
Email: click here TO access email
Homepage: http://privatewww.essex.ac.uk/~rclift/
Institution: University of Essex
Author: Fadi Helani
Institution: University of Aleppo
Linguistic Field: Discourse Analysis
Subject Language: Arabic, Standard
Abstract: The phrase inshallah ‘God willing’ is well known, even to non-Arabic speakers, as a mitigator of any statement regarding the future, or hopes for the future. Here we use the methods of conversation analysis (CA) to examine a less salient but nonetheless pervasive and compelling interactional usage: in topic-transition sequences. We use a corpus of Levantine (predominantly Syrian) Arabic talk-in-interaction to pay detailed attention to the sequential contexts of inshallah and its cognates across a number of exemplars. It emerges that these invocations are used to secure possible sequence and topic closure, and that they may engender reciprocal invocations. Topical talk following invocations or their responses is subsequently shown to be suspended by both parties; this provides for a move to a new topic by either party. (Arabic, religious expressions, conversation, conversation analysis, topic)

CUP AT LINGUIST

This article appears IN Language in Society Vol. 39, Issue 3, which you can READ on Cambridge's site .



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