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Language Planning as a Sociolinguistic Experiment

By: Ernst Jahr

Provides richly detailed insight into the uniqueness of the Norwegian language development. Marks the 200th anniversary of the birth of the Norwegian nation following centuries of Danish rule


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Acquiring Phonology: A Cross-Generational Case-Study

By Neil Smith

The study also highlights the constructs of current linguistic theory, arguing for distinctive features and the notion 'onset' and against some of the claims of Optimality Theory and Usage-based accounts.


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Language Production and Interpretation: Linguistics meets Cognition

By Henk Zeevat

The importance of Henk Zeevat's new monograph cannot be overstated. [...] I recommend it to anyone who combines interests in language, logic, and computation [...]. David Beaver, University of Texas at Austin


Academic Paper


Title: 'The sociolinguistics of a short-lived innovation: Tracing the development of quotative all across spoken and internet newsgroup data'
Author: IsabelleBuchstaller
Institution: 'Universit├Ąt Leipzig'
Author: JohnR.Rickford
Institution: 'Stanford University'
Author: ElizabethClossTraugott
Email: click here to access email
Institution: 'Stanford University'
Author: TomWasow
Email: click here to access email
Homepage: 'http://www-csli.stanford.edu/~wasow/wasow.html'
Institution: 'Stanford University'
Author: ArnoldM.Zwicky
Email: click here to access email
Homepage: 'http://www-csli.stanford.edu/~zwicky/'
Institution: 'Stanford University'
Linguistic Field: 'Sociolinguistics'
Subject Language: 'English'
Abstract: This paper examines a short-lived innovation, quotative all, in real and apparent time. We used a two-pronged method to trace the trajectory of all over the past two decades: (i) Quantitative analyses of the quotative system of young Californians from different decades; this reveals a startling crossover pattern: in 1990/1994, all predominates, but by 2005, it has given way to like. (ii) Searches of Internet newsgroups; these confirm that after rising briskly in the 1990s, all is declining. Tracing the changing usage of quotative options provides year-to-year evidence that all has recently given way to like. Our paper has two aims: We provide insights from ongoing language change regarding short-term innovations in the history of English. We also discuss our collaboration with Google Inc. and argue for the value of newsgroups to research projects investigating linguistic variation and change in real time, especially where recorded conversational tokens are relatively sparse.

CUP at LINGUIST

This article appears in Language Variation and Change Vol. 22, Issue 2, which you can read on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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