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Academic Paper


Title: Linguistic Syncretism and Language Ideologies: Transforming Sociolinguistic Hierarchy on Rapa Nui (Easter Island)
Paper URL: http://www.anthrosource.net/doi/abs/10.1525/aa.2004.106.3.529
Author: Miki Makihara
Email: click here TO access email
Homepage: http://qcpages.qc.cuny.edu/ANTHRO/makihara/makihara.html
Institution: Queens College (CUNY)
Linguistic Field: Anthropological Linguistics
Subject Language: Rapanui
Subject LANGUAGE Family: Austronesian
Abstract: Recent work in linguistic anthropology highlights the role of linguistic ideology, or cultural conceptions of language, in transforming social relations and linguistic structure and use. This paper examines the links between language attitudes and uses in their institutional and interactional contexts on Rapa Nui, a Polynesian island community that is part of the Chilean nation-state. By the 1970s, a sociolinguistic hierarchy and functional compartmentalization of languages between Spanish and Rapa Nui – what I will describe as colonial diglossia – had become established in the community, which was rapidly becoming bilingual. Language shift toward Spanish has continued to advance since then. However, rising Rapa Nui syncretic language practice and consciousness, combined with the political successes of a local indigenous movement and changes in the local economy, are now contributing to the breakdown of colonial diglossia, generating better conditions for the maintenance of the Rapa Nui language.
Type: Individual Paper
Status: Completed
Venue: http://www.anthrosource.net/doi/abs/10.1525/aa.2004.106.3.529
Publication Info: 2004. American Anthropologist 106(3):529–540.
URL: http://www.anthrosource.net/doi/abs/10.1525/aa.2004.106.3.529


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