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Oxford Handbook of Corpus Phonology

Edited by Jacques Durand, Ulrike Gut, and Gjert Kristoffersen

Offers the first detailed examination of corpus phonology and serves as a practical guide for researchers interested in compiling or using phonological corpora


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The Languages of the Jews: A Sociolinguistic History

By Bernard Spolsky

A vivid commentary on Jewish survival and Jewish speech communities that will be enjoyed by the general reader, and is essential reading for students and researchers interested in the study of Middle Eastern languages, Jewish studies, and sociolinguistics.


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Indo-European Linguistics

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Academic Paper


Title: Who Was Walking on the Beach?
Author: Gregory D Keating
Author: Bill VanPatten
Email: click here to access email
Institution: Michigan State University
Author: Jill Jegerski
Institution: College of Staten Island (CUNY)
Linguistic Field: Applied Linguistics; Language Acquisition; Psycholinguistics; Syntax
Subject Language: English
Spanish
Abstract: The position of antecedent strategy (Carminati, ) claims that speakers of null-subject languages prefer to resolve intrasentential anaphora by linking pro to an antecedent in the specifier of the inflection phrase and the overt pronoun to an antecedent lower in the clause. The present study has two aims: (a) to determine whether adult early Spanish-English bilinguals (Spanish heritage speakers) and late English-Spanish bilinguals (adult second language [L2] learners of Spanish) utilize the same antecedent assignment strategies as monolingually raised Spanish speakers, and (b) to determine whether early exposure to and use of Spanish confers advantages to Spanish heritage speakers relative to L2 learners. Spanish speakers raised without English contact (n = 19), Spanish heritage speakers (n = 25), and L2 learners of Spanish (n = 19) completed an offline questionnaire that comprised complex sentences such as 'Juan vio a Carlos mientras pro/él caminaba en la playa' 'John saw Charles while he was walking on the beach.' Comprehension questions probed participants' preferences regarding the antecedent of null and overt pronouns. The results indicate that the monolingually raised Spanish speakers showed an antecedent bias, but the heritage speakers and the L2 learners did not. Furthermore, the two groups of bilinguals differed from the controls in different ways: The heritage speakers displayed a stronger subject bias for the overt pronoun, whereas the L2 learners did not exhibit any clear antecedent biases.

CUP at LINGUIST

This article appears in Studies in Second Language Acquisition Vol. 33, Issue 2, which you can read on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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