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Vowel Length From Latin to Romance

By Michele Loporcaro

This book "draws on extensive empirical data, including from lesser known varieties" and "puts forward a new account of a well-known diachronic phenomenon."


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Letter Writing and Language Change

Edited By Anita Auer, Daniel Schreier, and Richard J. Watts

This book "challenges the assumption that there is only one 'legitimate' and homogenous form of English or of any other language" and "supports the view of different/alternative histories of the English language and will appeal to readers who are skeptical of 'standard' language ideology."


Academic Paper


Title: An Emergentist Perspective on Heritage Language Acquisition
Author: William O'Grady
Institution: University of Hawai'i at Mānoa
Author: Hye-Young Kwak
Author: On-Soon Lee
Author: Miseon Lee
Linguistic Field: Applied Linguistics; Language Acquisition; Psycholinguistics
Abstract: It is widely recognized that the processor has a key role to play in creating and strengthening the mapping between form and meaning that is integral to language use. Adopting an emergentist approach to heritage language acquisition, the current study considers the extent to which the operation of the processor can contribute to an account of what is acquired, what is subsequently retained or lost, and what is never acquired in the first place. These questions are explored from two perspectives. First, morphosyntactic phenomena for which there is apparently substantial input are considered, with a focus on the relevance of salience, frequency, and transparency to the establishment of form-meaning mappings. Second, a phenomenon for which there appears to be relatively little input (i.e., scope) is examined with a view to understanding its fate in heritage language acquisition. In both cases, the emergentist perspective appears to offer promising insights into why heritage language learners succeed-and fail-in the way that they do.

CUP AT LINGUIST

This article appears IN Studies in Second Language Acquisition Vol. 33, Issue 2, which you can READ on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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