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The Language Hoax

By John H. McWhorter

The Language Hoax "argues that that all humans process life the same way, regardless of their language."


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Language and Development in Africa

By H. Ekkehard Wolff

Language and Development in Africa "discusses the resourcefulness of languages, both local and global, in view of the ongoing transformation of African societies as much as for economic development.. "


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Academic Paper


Title: Natural discourse reference generation reduces cognitive load in spoken systems
Author: E. Campana
Institution: Arizona State University
Author: Michael K Tanenhaus
Institution: University of Rochester
Author: James F Allen
Homepage: http://www.cs.rochester.edu/users/faculty/james/
Institution: University of Rochester
Author: R. Remington
Institution: The University of Queensland
Linguistic Field: Computational Linguistics
Abstract: The generation of referring expressions is a central topic in computational linguistics. Natural referring expressions – both definite references like ‘the baseball cap’ and pronouns like ‘it’ – are dependent on discourse context. We examine the practical implications of context-dependent referring expression generation for the design of spoken systems. Currently, not all spoken systems have the goal of generating natural referring expressions. Many researchers believe that the context-dependency of natural referring expressions actually makes systems less usable. Using the dual-task paradigm, we demonstrate that generating natural referring expressions that are dependent on discourse context reduces cognitive load. Somewhat surprisingly, we also demonstrate that practice does not improve cognitive load in systems that generate consistent (context-independent) referring expressions. We discuss practical implications for spoken systems as well as other areas of referring expression generation.

CUP AT LINGUIST

This article appears IN Natural Language Engineering Vol. 17, Issue 3, which you can READ on Cambridge's site or on LINGUIST .



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