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Academic Paper


Title: Language, Time and Cinema
Paper URL: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2026900
Author: Debaprasad Bandyopadhyay
Email: click here TO access email
Homepage: https://spbu.academia.edu/DEBAPRASADBANDYOPADHYAY
Institution: La Filológica por la Causa
Linguistic Field: Discipline of Linguistics; Discourse Analysis; Morphology; Sociolinguistics
Subject Language: Bengali
Abstract: This paper argues that there are different types of time, (a) technological time as it is followed by watching the watch by selecting a norm (GMT); (b) grammatical time as it is revealed in the textbooks of Grammar; (c) perceptual time as it is perceived by the speaking subjects of a given speech community; (d) Scientific time as it is calculated by the locus of the perceived by deploying Tensor Calculus. The author showed that the prescriptions of grammatical time do not match with the perceptual time of different communities. The author argued that the tenses and aspects as categorized in the Bangla prescriptive grammars ignore the perceptions of the construct “time” by the speakers of the imagined community “Bangla” as the conjugational paradigm in the Bangla grammar book is the mimicry of English prescriptive grammatical paradigms, e.g., /L/1. ami tomar baRi kal jacchi/L/I your house tomorrow go present continuous /L/“ I am going to your house tomorrow”/L/2. ami tomake kal rastay dekhechi. /L/I you dative yesterday road locative see present perfect /L/“I have seen you on the road yesterday.”/L/In the case of 1, all the Bengali-speaking informants perceived /jacchi/ as future tense (I will go..) and in the case of 2, /dekhechi/ is perceived as past tense (I saw) instead of prescribed “present perfect” (which is traditionally used to denote “immediate past), though prescriptive grammar categorically put an imperative for not using “present perfect” in the sense of past (cf. Chattopadhyay, 1939: 322). It is matter of wonder that there is no linguistic work so far on the perceptual time in Bangla. /L/This paper also concentrated on the semiotics of time in Cinema or particularly on the concept of time in the hyper-real, real (as it is symbolized) and in the ir-real. The author compared the difference between “reel” time and “real” time at the moment of perceiving hyper-real. As the author has dealt with the subjective perceptions of time in different locus and contexts by different individuals of different imagined communities, it is concluded that there is no generalized objective parameters for the historical a priori, “time”./L/Keywords: perceptual, grammatical, scientific time
Type: Individual Paper
Status: Completed
Publication Info: Silhouette. Vol.III, pp.112-25, 2003
URL: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2026900


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