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Latin: A Linguistic Introduction

By Renato Oniga and Norma Shifano

Applies the principles of contemporary linguistics to the study of Latin and provides clear explanations of grammatical rules alongside diagrams to illustrate complex structures.


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The Ancient Language, and the Dialect of Cornwall, with an Enlarged Glossary of Cornish Provincial Words

By Frederick W.P. Jago

Containing around 3,700 dialect words from both Cornish and English,, this glossary was published in 1882 by Frederick W. P. Jago (1817–92) in an effort to describe and preserve the dialect as it too declined and it is an invaluable record of a disappearing dialect and way of life.


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Linguistic Bibliography for the Year 2013

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Academic Paper


Title: An Incessant Struggle for Writing a Societal Lexicon
Paper URL: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2028483
Author: Debaprasad Bandyopadhyay
Email: click here to access email
Homepage: https://independent.academia.edu/DebaprasadBandyopadhyay
Institution: Indian Statistical Institute
Linguistic Field: Lexicography; Morphology
Abstract: This is a paper on the problems of writing a Bangla dictionary on societal terms. Writing a lexicon by fixing a stable meaning with compositional function to something called 'word' (citation form) is always a problem as the area of meaning is a slippery area and cannot escape fuzziness. Sometimes the term and its network with other terms within the imagined speech community conveys just the opposite meaning of the lemmatized term, e.g., the values ascribed to the network of some words (like the celebration of 'fundamental truth/knowledge' in contrast with the negation of “fundamentalism” in contrast with the fête of 'eco-fundamentalism'; 'black' as in black- market /money/mail in contrast with the 'black' as it is used in the context of man and woman) are not the same as one of its lexical network-members. Furthermore, the order of things of the lemma always transgresses their boundary, though they (order of things in the lexical network as revealed in different components with an ultimate 'etc.') are considered as a 'taking it for granted' order and that discursive order is controlled, appropriated by the non-discursive formation of the regulative society. The technical terms, 'society', 'community', 'nation state', 'civil society' do not match with the Bengali worldviews of 'kowm'(roughly 'community'), 'sOmaj'(society), 'bOrno' (caste), 'jat(i)' etc., though preconditioned by the colonial order of things, a lexicographer is striving for the matching condition. The author of this paper negates the possibility of any truth-claims regarding a 'complete' dictionary with 'stable' meaning of 'words' with differing as well as deferring components. The author concludes componential analysis is a futile effort with unending 'etc.' and this type of analysis avoids fuzziness of the lexical entry; etymology does not provide so-called 'authentic', 'original' meaning or this practice of dissecting the body of the 'signifier' does not lead to the body of the so-called 'signified'; lemmatization provides tautologus information by fixing a stable meaning, though, no doubt, it struggles to connect the lexical network of a given speech community; searching for stable meaning does not consider the (dis)continuous changes and simultaneous cohabitation of diachrony in synchrony in a given society; all formal system for categorization lacks completeness - difference always pervades the identity of the term.
Type: Individual Paper
Status: Completed
Publication Info: Shileendhra, Vol. 39, No. 1, pp.115-128, 2005
URL: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2028483


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